1. A human baby is 75% water. Tomatoes are wetter (93.5 percent water). Apples, too, but only slightly (80 percent). Check out this fruit vs. baby comparison. View in High-Res

    A human baby is 75% water. Tomatoes are wetter (93.5 percent water). Apples, too, but only slightly (80 percent). Check out this fruit vs. baby comparison.

  2. fruit

    babies

    water

    fruit vs. babies

  1. Posted on 22 May, 2012

    561 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from jwp

    wrightbryan3:

jwp:

Pumping water for the family camels in #mongolia. Google ‘npr mongolia’ for pictures and stories about the mining boom there. (Taken with Instagram at South Gobi, Mongolia)

Or just click here to go straight to the story.
Ha! Sorry for the double post. It’s such a good picture that I’m just going to leave it. —Wright
View in High-Res

    wrightbryan3:

    jwp:

    Pumping water for the family camels in #mongolia. Google ‘npr mongolia’ for pictures and stories about the mining boom there. (Taken with Instagram at South Gobi, Mongolia)

    Or just click here to go straight to the story.

    Ha! Sorry for the double post. It’s such a good picture that I’m just going to leave it. —Wright

  2. Mongolia

    NPR

    water

  1. Girl with a red bucket. (John Poole /NPR) #haiti #water #red  (Taken with instagram) View in High-Res

    Girl with a red bucket. (John Poole /NPR) #haiti #water #red (Taken with instagram)

  2. water

    haiti

    red

  1. Posted on 10 November, 2011

    462 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from kate2fit

    climateadaptation: This is a picture of crews working for The Department of Water Protection in Los Angeles, CA pouring 3 million black plastic balls into the Ivanhoe Reservoir on June 10th, 2008. Scientists discovered that when sunlight is combined with the bromides and chlorine that are present in the water, a carcinogen bromate is formed which can be harmful to humans. The Department of Water Protection realized the problem and began construction of a new covered reservoir, but while a new underground facility was being built, they had to determine a way to keep the sunlight out of the water. They explored the possibility of tarps and metal coverings but they were either too expensive or very ugly. They settled on the idea of bird balls which are designed to keep water fowl from landing where they shouldn’t. They are non toxic, and only cost about 34 cents each. The total cost of protecting the Ivanhoe reservoir as well as the Elysian reservoir that was facing the same problem was 2 million dollars. The balls were estimated to remain in the water for five years until the new reservoir is completed.


Via: Supertight
View in High-Res

    climateadaptation: This is a picture of crews working for The Department of Water Protection in Los Angeles, CA pouring 3 million black plastic balls into the Ivanhoe Reservoir on June 10th, 2008. Scientists discovered that when sunlight is combined with the bromides and chlorine that are present in the water, a carcinogen bromate is formed which can be harmful to humans. The Department of Water Protection realized the problem and began construction of a new covered reservoir, but while a new underground facility was being built, they had to determine a way to keep the sunlight out of the water. They explored the possibility of tarps and metal coverings but they were either too expensive or very ugly. They settled on the idea of bird balls which are designed to keep water fowl from landing where they shouldn’t. They are non toxic, and only cost about 34 cents each. The total cost of protecting the Ivanhoe reservoir as well as the Elysian reservoir that was facing the same problem was 2 million dollars. The balls were estimated to remain in the water for five years until the new reservoir is completed.

    Via: Supertight

  2. water

    reservoir

    drinking water

    technology

    environmental protection

    cities

    infrastructure

  1. Posted on 17 August, 2011

    373 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from poptech

    smartercities:

    Tube City: A sustainable water-purifying city for Delhi

    Tube City is a design for a 21 km long tube running over the Yamuna River in the city of Delhi. Conceived by Abhinay Sharma, the tube itself would be a living sustainable city with in-house farms and residential, commercial and office zones. A central metro spine and road network would keep the tube well connected, and the structure could also draw in water from the river for purification and consumption.

    (via Ufahari)

    via poptech:

  2. India

    Tube City

    achitecture

    design

    sustainability

    water

    cities