1. For the Fourth of July, we asked mixologist and soda fountain entrepreneur Gina Chersevani to help us find a patriotic way into the homemade soda trend.
Fizz And Fireworks: Make A Patriotic Homemade Soda For The Fourth : The Salt :
Photo: Audie Cornish for NPR
Related: Kick The Can: Soda Machines Beg For Experimentation View in High-Res

    For the Fourth of July, we asked mixologist and soda fountain entrepreneur Gina Chersevani to help us find a patriotic way into the homemade soda trend.

    Fizz And Fireworks: Make A Patriotic Homemade Soda For The Fourth : The Salt :

    Photo: Audie Cornish for NPR

    Related: Kick The Can: Soda Machines Beg For Experimentation

  2. food

    soda

    sparkling

    carbonation

    fizz

  1. Tastes Like Home: As Regional Sodas Expand, Could They Lose What Makes Them Special? - Jobs & Economy - The Atlantic Cities
Foxon Park and its peers — Moxie (Maine), Cheerwine (North Carolina), Vernor’s (Michigan), White Rock (New York), Big Red (Texas), Boylan’s (New Jersey), among others — were the sodas that time forgot. As the exhaustive consolidation of small brands produced standardized American consumer products from coast to coast, they remained, against all odds, regional favorites. Coca-Cola and Pepsi became titans of the American soda market, and yet these bubbly icons of regionalism endured. Locals treasured them, former residents pined for them, and the rest of us hardly knew they existed.
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Mmmmm, Cheerwine! That’s all I’m saying about soda on here though, not another word. Nope. =:ox — tanya b.

    Tastes Like Home: As Regional Sodas Expand, Could They Lose What Makes Them Special? - Jobs & Economy - The Atlantic Cities

    Foxon Park and its peers — Moxie (Maine), Cheerwine (North Carolina), Vernor’s (Michigan), White Rock (New York), Big Red (Texas), Boylan’s (New Jersey), among others — were the sodas that time forgot. As the exhaustive consolidation of small brands produced standardized American consumer products from coast to coast, they remained, against all odds, regional favorites. Coca-Cola and Pepsi became titans of the American soda market, and yet these bubbly icons of regionalism endured. Locals treasured them, former residents pined for them, and the rest of us hardly knew they existed.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Mmmmm, Cheerwine! That’s all I’m saying about soda on here though, not another word. Nope. =:ox — tanya b.

  2. soda

    cheerwine

    regional fizz

  1. Posted on 9 July, 2012

    586 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from usatoday

    It’s soda. /gavel — Tanya B. 
usatoday:

A Twitter data scientist details how we refer to soda — er, pop — across the country.
Soda vs. Pop with Twitter - Edwin Chen’s Blog
View in High-Res

    It’s soda. /gavel — Tanya B.

    usatoday:

    A Twitter data scientist details how we refer to soda — er, pop — across the country.


    Soda vs. Pop with Twitter - Edwin Chen’s Blog

  2. soda

    regional differences

    pop

  1. Posted on 1 September, 2011

    140 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from lookhigh

    lookhigh:

In Soda Revival, Fizzy Taste Bubbles Up From The Past
“The soda fountain was once an equivalent to the local saloon,” says Darcy O’Neil, the author ofFix the Pumps, a history of the golden age of soda fountains. In 1875, he explains, there was a soda counter in almost every American city….
“In the beginning, pharmacists are using good flavors to hide flavors they need us to drink,” explains mixologist Owen Thompson…. 
So, you’d walk into the pharmacy, pick up your foul-tasting medicine, and then walk to the other side of the counter, where the pharmacist had a soda jerk. He’d mix the medicine with a sweet, flavored syrup and soda water.
“At first, [the pharmacists] used sweetened soda water to conceal the taste of bitter drugs like quinine and iron. Then they started to add more exotic substances,” says O’Neil, the drink historian. (NPR)
Photo: A 1939 soda jerk flips ice cream into malted milk shakes in Corpus Christi, Texas. (Library of Congress)

    lookhigh:

    In Soda Revival, Fizzy Taste Bubbles Up From The Past

    “The soda fountain was once an equivalent to the local saloon,” says Darcy O’Neil, the author ofFix the Pumps, a history of the golden age of soda fountains. In 1875, he explains, there was a soda counter in almost every American city….

    “In the beginning, pharmacists are using good flavors to hide flavors they need us to drink,” explains mixologist Owen Thompson…. 

    So, you’d walk into the pharmacy, pick up your foul-tasting medicine, and then walk to the other side of the counter, where the pharmacist had a soda jerk. He’d mix the medicine with a sweet, flavored syrup and soda water.

    “At first, [the pharmacists] used sweetened soda water to conceal the taste of bitter drugs like quinine and iron. Then they started to add more exotic substances,” says O’Neil, the drink historian. (NPR)

    Photo: A 1939 soda jerk flips ice cream into malted milk shakes in Corpus Christi, Texas. (Library of Congress)

  2. food

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