1. Posted on 28 October, 2013

    585 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from nprfreshair

    The destruction of evidence begins within hours of the president’s death. President Kennedy is assassinated on a Friday. On Saturday night his autopsy report is pushed into the fireplace by the Navy pathologist. Several hours after that, FBI agents in Dallas shred a handwritten note that Oswald had left for them a few weeks before and flush it down the toilet. Then several hours after that, Marina Oswald, Oswald’s widow, puts a match to photographs that show her husband holding the assassination rifle. And that’s just the first weekend of evidence destruction, it goes on, and on, and on in the weeks that follow.

    — Philip Shenon, author of “A Cruel and Shocking Act”  shares his research on the Kennedy assassination investigation on Fresh Air today (via nprfreshair)

  2. kennedy

    philip shenon

    1963

  1. Posted on 22 November, 2011

    551 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from life

    life: From John Fitzgerald Kennedy’s nomination acceptance address, now commonly referred to as “the New Frontier speech,” delivered at the Democratic National Convention, July 15, 1960, in Los Angeles:
“We are not here to curse the darkness; we are here to light a candle. As Winston Churchill said on taking office some twenty years ago: If we open a quarrel between the present and the past, we shall be in danger of losing the future. Today our concern must be with that future. For the world is changing. The old era is ending. The old ways will not do.”
On the 48th anniversary of JFK’s assassination, here, an exclusive look at unpublished, never-seen photos of our 35th president.


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    life: From John Fitzgerald Kennedy’s nomination acceptance address, now commonly referred to as “the New Frontier speech,” delivered at the Democratic National Convention, July 15, 1960, in Los Angeles:

    “We are not here to curse the darkness; we are here to light a candle. As Winston Churchill said on taking office some twenty years ago: If we open a quarrel between the present and the past, we shall be in danger of losing the future. Today our concern must be with that future. For the world is changing. The old era is ending. The old ways will not do.”

    On the 48th anniversary of JFK’s assassination, here, an exclusive look at unpublished, never-seen photos of our 35th president.

  2. photography

    vintage

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    JFK

    kennedy

    president kennedy