1. Whether by choice or by circumstance, a lot of Americans are spending Thanksgiving alone. Some are too busy with work or school, or can’t afford to travel. Others have family tensions or prefer to skip the dinner-table questions and bad jokes. A few are even crossing to Canada, where it’s just another Thursday.
via Table For One, Please. A Solo Thanksgiving
Also: How Did Thanksgiving End Up On The Fourth Thursday?
Photo: iStockphoto.com View in High-Res

    Whether by choice or by circumstance, a lot of Americans are spending Thanksgiving alone. Some are too busy with work or school, or can’t afford to travel. Others have family tensions or prefer to skip the dinner-table questions and bad jokes. A few are even crossing to Canada, where it’s just another Thursday.

    via Table For One, Please. A Solo Thanksgiving

    Also: How Did Thanksgiving End Up On The Fourth Thursday?

    Photo: iStockphoto.com

  2. Thanksgiving

    holidays

  1. 
So if George Bailey had never been born, the warm and  vivacious Mary Hatch would have become a myopic spinster  librarian? George is a heck of a guy, and Mary adored him from  childhood, but why should she be denied love just because he didn’t  exist? (And would a honky-tonk Gomorrah like Pottersville even have a library?) I prefer to think that the alternate-universe Mary would  have married the smitten Sam Wainwright and lived comfortably on his  arms-manufacturer profits.


- Author Alonso Duralde on questionable things that have appeared in classic holiday films.
Not included in his list: a discussion on why Ralphie doesn’t actually shoot his eye out, despite the fact it could have served as an object lesson for children everywhere (or at least children in households that watch TBS) when it comes to taking responsibility for their decisions. -@acarvin

    So if George Bailey had never been born, the warm and vivacious Mary Hatch would have become a myopic spinster librarian? George is a heck of a guy, and Mary adored him from childhood, but why should she be denied love just because he didn’t exist? (And would a honky-tonk Gomorrah like Pottersville even have a library?) I prefer to think that the alternate-universe Mary would have married the smitten Sam Wainwright and lived comfortably on his arms-manufacturer profits.

    - Author Alonso Duralde on questionable things that have appeared in classic holiday films.

    Not included in his list: a discussion on why Ralphie doesn’t actually shoot his eye out, despite the fact it could have served as an object lesson for children everywhere (or at least children in households that watch TBS) when it comes to taking responsibility for their decisions. -@acarvin

  2. holidays

    holiday films

    It's A Wonderful Life

    You'll shoot your eye out!

  1. 
"This modern version of Thanksgiving would horrify the devout Pilgrims  and Puritans who sailed to America in the 17th century. The holiday that  gave rise to Thanksgiving — a ‘public day’ that they observed regularly —  was almost the precise opposite of today’s celebration. It was not  secular, but deeply religious. At its center was not an extravagant  meal, but a long fast. And its chief concern was not bounty but  redemption: to examine the faults in oneself — and one’s community —  with an eye toward spiritual improvement."

- Historian Eve  Laplante, originally quoted in a 2007 Boston Globe article. NPR’s Linton Weeks takes a look at how the excesses of Thanksgiving have become, well, excessively excessive. View in High-Res

    "This modern version of Thanksgiving would horrify the devout Pilgrims and Puritans who sailed to America in the 17th century. The holiday that gave rise to Thanksgiving — a ‘public day’ that they observed regularly — was almost the precise opposite of today’s celebration. It was not secular, but deeply religious. At its center was not an extravagant meal, but a long fast. And its chief concern was not bounty but redemption: to examine the faults in oneself — and one’s community — with an eye toward spiritual improvement."

    - Historian Eve Laplante, originally quoted in a 2007 Boston Globe article. NPR’s Linton Weeks takes a look at how the excesses of Thanksgiving have become, well, excessively excessive.

  2. gluttony

    holidays

    overkill

    thanksgiving

    turducken