1. Schizophrenia typically starts in the late teens or early 20s. But if you could stop that first psychotic break, could you stop the mental illness in its tracks? Some doctors think so.
Halting Schizophrenia Before It Starts
Caption: Meghan, 23, began experiencing hallucinations at 19. “Driving home, cars’ headlights turned into eyes. The grills on the cars turned into mouths and none of them looked happy. It would scare the crap out of me,” Meghan says.
Photo Credit: Marvi Lacar for NPR View in High-Res

    Schizophrenia typically starts in the late teens or early 20s. But if you could stop that first psychotic break, could you stop the mental illness in its tracks? Some doctors think so.

    Halting Schizophrenia Before It Starts

    Caption: Meghan, 23, began experiencing hallucinations at 19. “Driving home, cars’ headlights turned into eyes. The grills on the cars turned into mouths and none of them looked happy. It would scare the crap out of me,” Meghan says.

    Photo Credit: Marvi Lacar for NPR

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    schizophrenia

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  1. NPR correspondent Allison Aubrey explains a surprising new finding on the connection between fish consumption and hearing for our Snapchat Fact of the Day. If you aren’t already following us, add us at “nprnews.” We post an interesting fact from a reporter every day.

    And make sure to read Allison’s full story on our Shots blog.

  2. Health

    fish

    Allison Aubrey

  1. Tobacco control advocates disagree on whether e-cigarettes are a useful tool to get smokers off tobacco, or just a sleeker form of one of the world’s deadliest addictions.
A lot of that discord comes from the fact that there’s just not enough science to know the risks and benefits of e-cigarettes, which deliver nicotine in a vapor rather than through tobacco smoke. And it could take years to find out if vaping causes cancer and other deadly diseases.
But that lack of certainty means that people need more protection, not less, according to a report released Tuesday by the World Health Organization. 
Health Organizations Call For A Ban On E-Cigarettes Indoors
Photo credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images View in High-Res

    Tobacco control advocates disagree on whether e-cigarettes are a useful tool to get smokers off tobacco, or just a sleeker form of one of the world’s deadliest addictions.

    A lot of that discord comes from the fact that there’s just not enough science to know the risks and benefits of e-cigarettes, which deliver nicotine in a vapor rather than through tobacco smoke. And it could take years to find out if vaping causes cancer and other deadly diseases.

    But that lack of certainty means that people need more protection, not less, according to a report released Tuesday by the World Health Organization. 

    Health Organizations Call For A Ban On E-Cigarettes Indoors

    Photo credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

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  1. "What Makes Us Fat: Is It Eating Too Much Or Moving Too Little?" via Patti Neighmond
"We’re constantly hearing messages that we’re eating too much and not moving around enough. Now researchers suggest that we’re actually not eating more than we did 20 years ago, it’s that we’re much less active. And that includes not just middle-aged workers tied to their desks, but also young men and women who spend their days sitting in front of their laptops."
Image: Maria Fabrizio/NPR View in High-Res

    "What Makes Us Fat: Is It Eating Too Much Or Moving Too Little?" via Patti Neighmond

    "We’re constantly hearing messages that we’re eating too much and not moving around enough. Now researchers suggest that we’re actually not eating more than we did 20 years ago, it’s that we’re much less active. And that includes not just middle-aged workers tied to their desks, but also young men and women who spend their days sitting in front of their laptops."

    Image: Maria Fabrizio/NPR

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  1. "Food-Mood Connection: How You Eat Can Amp Up Or Tamp Down Stress" via Allison Aubrey
If you’re reaching for the potato chips when you’re stressed, then you’re not alone. In a national survey, more than one-third of participants said they alter their diets when they’re stressed, often turning to foods that comfort them. Doctors suggest links between our moods and what we eat –– so, next time, grab a couple pieces of dark chocolate instead. Nutrient-rich foods might just help you keep a cap on your stress.
– Alexander
Image: Meredith Rizzo/NPR View in High-Res

    "Food-Mood Connection: How You Eat Can Amp Up Or Tamp Down Stress" via Allison Aubrey

    If you’re reaching for the potato chips when you’re stressed, then you’re not alone. In a national survey, more than one-third of participants said they alter their diets when they’re stressed, often turning to foods that comfort them. Doctors suggest links between our moods and what we eat –– so, next time, grab a couple pieces of dark chocolate instead. Nutrient-rich foods might just help you keep a cap on your stress.

    – Alexander

    Image: Meredith Rizzo/NPR

  2. The Salt

    Allison Aubrey

    Food

    Mood

    Health

  1. "Online Psychotherapy Gains Fans And Raises Privacy Concerns" via Maanvi Singh
More and more millennials are taking to the Internet for online therapy, and some insurance providers are even reimbursing patients for these sessions. Some studies suggest that online sessions may be just as effective as face-to-face therapy. Although the APA released a guideline for online therapy last year, its rise in popularity still raises several concerns.
– Alexander
Image: Katherine Streeter/NPR View in High-Res

    "Online Psychotherapy Gains Fans And Raises Privacy Concerns" via Maanvi Singh

    More and more millennials are taking to the Internet for online therapy, and some insurance providers are even reimbursing patients for these sessions. Some studies suggest that online sessions may be just as effective as face-to-face therapy. Although the APA released a guideline for online therapy last year, its rise in popularity still raises several concerns.

    Alexander

    Image: Katherine Streeter/NPR

  2. Shots

    Maanvi Singh

    Health

    Mental Health

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  1. School Lunch Debate: What’s At Stake?
School lunches have never been known for culinary excellence. But to be fair, the National School Lunch Program — which provides free or reduced lunches to about 31 million kids every day — has never aimed to dazzle as much as to fill little bellies.
Image: kcline/iStockphoto.com

    School Lunch Debate: What’s At Stake?

    School lunches have never been known for culinary excellence. But to be fair, the National School Lunch Program — which provides free or reduced lunches to about 31 million kids every day — has never aimed to dazzle as much as to fill little bellies.

    Image: kcline/iStockphoto.com

  2. The Salt

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    school lunch

  1. Photo: Jonathan Steinberg/NPR
"Evidence On Marijuana’s Health Effects Is Crazy At Best"
Colorado opened its first pot stores in January, and adults in Washington state will be able to walk into a store and buy marijuana this summer. But this legalization of recreational marijuana is taking place without much information on the possible health effects. View in High-Res

    Photo: Jonathan Steinberg/NPR

    "Evidence On Marijuana’s Health Effects Is Crazy At Best"

    Colorado opened its first pot stores in January, and adults in Washington state will be able to walk into a store and buy marijuana this summer. But this legalization of recreational marijuana is taking place without much information on the possible health effects.

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    Health

  1. Posted on 22 January, 2014

    533 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from theatlantic

    theatlantic:

Newly Insured Americans Don’t Understand Basic Healthcare Terms

An estimated 14 percent of English-speaking adults in the United States have below-basic literacy, or an inability to perform simple reading tasks. But 35 percent have only basic or below-basic health literacy. That means more than 77 million people have difficulty with common health-related reading tasks.
Health literacy involves the ability to obtain, process, and understand the health information necessary to make appropriate decisions, and it’s clearly essential to selecting health insurance. More Americans are enrolling in federal and state-based marketplaces, but being insured is only the beginning when it comes to reducing health disparities related to literacy.
Low health literacy disproportionately affects vulnerable populations that include individuals now eligible for new health insurance options: those with lower socioeconomic status and education, or disabilities; non-white racial and ethnic groups; the elderly.
Many of these Americans are now contending with unfamiliar insurance terms and are at risk of making uninformed choices that they may regret. This matters because those with low health literacy already tend to experience poorer health and to generate increased costs, estimated by some to amount to more than $100 billion annually.
Read more. [Image: Joe Elswick/AP]

View in High-Res

    theatlantic:

    Newly Insured Americans Don’t Understand Basic Healthcare Terms

    An estimated 14 percent of English-speaking adults in the United States have below-basic literacy, or an inability to perform simple reading tasks. But 35 percent have only basic or below-basic health literacy. That means more than 77 million people have difficulty with common health-related reading tasks.

    Health literacy involves the ability to obtain, process, and understand the health information necessary to make appropriate decisions, and it’s clearly essential to selecting health insurance. More Americans are enrolling in federal and state-based marketplaces, but being insured is only the beginning when it comes to reducing health disparities related to literacy.

    Low health literacy disproportionately affects vulnerable populations that include individuals now eligible for new health insurance options: those with lower socioeconomic status and education, or disabilities; non-white racial and ethnic groups; the elderly.

    Many of these Americans are now contending with unfamiliar insurance terms and are at risk of making uninformed choices that they may regret. This matters because those with low health literacy already tend to experience poorer health and to generate increased costs, estimated by some to amount to more than $100 billion annually.

    Read more. [Image: Joe Elswick/AP]

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  1. Posted on 13 January, 2014

    850 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from theatlantic

    theatlantic:

Study: Caffeine Can Improve Memory

Caffeine can improve attention and focus, we’ve known for a while. It also enhances working memory (short term, in the moment). Caffeine’s effects on long-term memory, though, if any, aren’t well established.
A study published yesterday in the journal Nature Neuroscience gets into that in a unique way, looking at caffeine’s effect on memory consolidation.
Read more. [Image: RaghavanPrabhu/Flickr]

View in High-Res

    theatlantic:

    Study: Caffeine Can Improve Memory

    Caffeine can improve attention and focus, we’ve known for a while. It also enhances working memory (short term, in the moment). Caffeine’s effects on long-term memory, though, if any, aren’t well established.

    A study published yesterday in the journal Nature Neuroscience gets into that in a unique way, looking at caffeine’s effect on memory consolidation.

    Read more. [Image: RaghavanPrabhu/Flickr]

  2. health

    caffeine

    memory

    science