1. Posted on 21 August, 2014

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    nprfreshair:

FXX is going to have a 12-day Simpsons marathon, playing all 552 episodes.  In appreciation of the series, we’ve compiled several of our Simpsons interviews into one show. 
Since The Simpsons began, Fresh Air’s Terry Gross has interviewed many people who have had a hand creating the show – from Matt Groening in 1989 and 2003 to  two of the writers Al Jean and Mike Reiss in 1992. Gross also talked with actors who do the voices, including Nancy Cartwright, who plays Bart, in 2007; Julie Kavner, the voice of Marge in 1994; Hank Azaria, the voice of Moe, Apu, Chief Wiggum and others in 2004.
Here, Simpsons creator Matt Groening tells Terry about how they occasionally got in trouble with the Fox network: 

"At the beginning, virtually anything we did would get somebody upset and now it seems like the people who are eager to be offended — and this country is full of people who are eager to be offended. They’ve given up on our show. We got into trouble a few years ago for — Homer is watching an anti-drinking commercial and it said, "Warning! Beer causes rectal cancer." And Homer responds by saying, "Mmm beer." Fox didn’t want us to do that because beer advertisers are a big part of the Fox empire and it turns out the writer was able to track down the actual fact where some studies show that indeed it does — or did or has a tendency to [cause cancer] — so we were able to keep it in."

Photo: Courtesy of Fox 
View in High-Res

    nprfreshair:

    FXX is going to have a 12-day Simpsons marathon, playing all 552 episodes.  In appreciation of the series, we’ve compiled several of our Simpsons interviews into one show. 

    Since The Simpsons began, Fresh Air’s Terry Gross has interviewed many people who have had a hand creating the show – from Matt Groening in 1989 and 2003 to  two of the writers Al Jean and Mike Reiss in 1992. Gross also talked with actors who do the voices, including Nancy Cartwright, who plays Bart, in 2007; Julie Kavner, the voice of Marge in 1994; Hank Azaria, the voice of Moe, Apu, Chief Wiggum and others in 2004.

    Here, Simpsons creator Matt Groening tells Terry about how they occasionally got in trouble with the Fox network: 

    "At the beginning, virtually anything we did would get somebody upset and now it seems like the people who are eager to be offended — and this country is full of people who are eager to be offended. They’ve given up on our show. We got into trouble a few years ago for — Homer is watching an anti-drinking commercial and it said, "Warning! Beer causes rectal cancer." And Homer responds by saying, "Mmm beer." Fox didn’t want us to do that because beer advertisers are a big part of the Fox empire and it turns out the writer was able to track down the actual fact where some studies show that indeed it does — or did or has a tendency to [cause cancer] — so we were able to keep it in."

    Photo: Courtesy of Fox 

  2. simpsons

    fresh air

    the simpsons

  1. From Fresh Air, "The Women Behind ‘Obvious Child’ Talk Farts, Abortion And Stage Fright" View in High-Res

    From Fresh Air, "The Women Behind ‘Obvious Child’ Talk Farts, Abortion And Stage Fright"

  2. Fresh Air

    Jenny Slate

    Obvious Child

    movies

    Gilliam Robespierre

  1. via imgur View in High-Res

    via imgur

  2. fresh air

    terry gross

  1. Posted on 26 November, 2013

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    nprfreshair:

Tomorrow we’ve got Jack Bishop and Bridget Lancaster of America’s Test Kitchen here to give you cooking tips on turkey, stuffing, potatoes, pies (and more) for Thanksgiving!
We’ll shimmy for that.

This is today and this is the best.

    nprfreshair:

    Tomorrow we’ve got Jack Bishop and Bridget Lancaster of America’s Test Kitchen here to give you cooking tips on turkey, stuffing, potatoes, pies (and more) for Thanksgiving!

    We’ll shimmy for that.

    This is today and this is the best.

  2. america's test kitchen.

    thanksgiving

    fresh air

  1. nprfreshair:

Comedy duo Keegan-Michael Key (left) an Jordan Peele of Comedy Central’s Key & Peele  are on Fresh Air TODAY to talk about boundary-pushing comedy and biracial identity and how the two come together.

today!  View in High-Res

    nprfreshair:

    Comedy duo Keegan-Michael Key (left) an Jordan Peele of Comedy Central’s Key & Peele  are on Fresh Air TODAY to talk about boundary-pushing comedy and biracial identity and how the two come together.

    today! 

  2. key & peele

    fresh air

  1. They happen really fast, the sunrises. Sometimes you specifically set the alarm on your watch to go watch the sunrise. And as you pull yourself down into the floor - and that’s where the huge, bulging window is, that we call the cupola - and there’s the world glowing dark underneath you. And you start to see a few faint tinges of a sunrise coming as it starts to light the upper atmosphere, and then bam. The sun just pops into view, roars into view, because we’re coming around the world at it so fast.

    And you can actually watch the sun move away from the Earth. And the light from it initially comes through the atmosphere. So the whole station glows with the light of dawn, with - all the big solar arrays glow blood red, and then orange. And then, as the sun clears the atmosphere, and it’s directly on us, then they settle down to sort of an iridescent blue. And then you can see the dawn come across the world towards you.

    And then you go back to work and wait another 92 minutes, and it happens again. It’s not to be missed, and I tried to watch as many sunrises and sunsets as the work would allow.

    — Astronaut Chris Hadfield talks to Terry Gross

  2. space

    chris hadfield

    ground control to major tom

    terry gross

    fresh air

  1. Posted on 16 October, 2013

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    Reblogged from nprfreshair

    Calgary is a city built on this resource. Calgary is like a classic boom town; all of the skyscrapers in Calgary are named after the energy companies that are extracting the oil from the oil sands, or the banks that are funding them. There are construction cranes all over. And Canada … is defining itself as an energy superpower. I think it surprises a lot of people to hear they have the third-largest oil reserve in the world, behind Venezuela and Saudi Arabia.

    —  Reporter for the New Yorker Ryan Lizza speaks on Fresh Air about the Canadian oil industry and the Keystone Pipeline XL controversy (via nprfreshair)

  2. fresh air

    ryan lizza

    new yorker

  1. Posted on 8 October, 2013

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    nprfreshair:

Elizabeth Smart shares the story of her kidnapping and how she pieced her life back together after such a traumatic experience. Smart attests her strength to advice her mother gave her:

The morning after I was rescued my mom gave me the best advice I’ve ever been given. … My mom said to me, ‘Elizabeth, what this man has done to you, it’s terrible, there aren’t words strong enough to describe how wicked and evil he is. He has stolen nine months of your life from you that you will never get back. But the best punishment you could ever give him, is to be happy, is to move forward with your life and to do exactly what you want to do. … The best thing you can do is move forward because by feeling sorry for yourself, and holding on to what’s happened, that’s only allowing him more power and more control over your life and he doesn’t deserve another second. So be happy.’ … I’m not perfect at following her advice … but I do try to follow it every day.

Hear the interview, read an excerpt from her book, or listen to a clip from the audiobook (which she reads herself) here
photo via USA Today
View in High-Res

    nprfreshair:

    Elizabeth Smart shares the story of her kidnapping and how she pieced her life back together after such a traumatic experience. Smart attests her strength to advice her mother gave her:

    The morning after I was rescued my mom gave me the best advice I’ve ever been given. … My mom said to me, ‘Elizabeth, what this man has done to you, it’s terrible, there aren’t words strong enough to describe how wicked and evil he is. He has stolen nine months of your life from you that you will never get back. But the best punishment you could ever give him, is to be happy, is to move forward with your life and to do exactly what you want to do. … The best thing you can do is move forward because by feeling sorry for yourself, and holding on to what’s happened, that’s only allowing him more power and more control over your life and he doesn’t deserve another second. So be happy.’ … I’m not perfect at following her advice … but I do try to follow it every day.

    Hear the interview, read an excerpt from her book, or listen to a clip from the audiobook (which she reads herself) here

    photo via USA Today

  2. elizabeth smart

    fresh air

  1. Posted on 4 October, 2013

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    nprfreshair:

Heisenbird.
Terry’s dear friend, Paula, took this photo of her “baby blue” parakeet, Willie, and dressed it up a bit. We loved it so much that we just had to share it with you.

Here’s a link to yesterday’s Fresh Air interview with Breaking Bad writers Thomas Schnauz and Peter Gould.  Enjoy. 
Photo courtesy of Paula Randolph

the heisenbird.

    nprfreshair:

    Heisenbird.

    Terry’s dear friend, Paula, took this photo of her “baby blue” parakeet, Willie, and dressed it up a bit. We loved it so much that we just had to share it with you.

    Here’s a link to yesterday’s Fresh Air interview with Breaking Bad writers Thomas Schnauz and Peter Gould.  Enjoy. 

    Photo courtesy of Paula Randolph

    the heisenbird.

  2. heisenbird

    heisenberg

    breaking bad

    fresh air

  1. Posted on 3 October, 2013

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    Like every episode we all sit together in a room in Burbank and we talk about every single beat and we write them down on index cards and pin them to a board and figure out what each episode is going to be. It was that same way for the final episode except for the absolute sadness after we were done, that we were like, ‘This is it, there’s no more.’ So I remember us pinning that final card to the board, Genny Hutchison got the honors to do it, and it was over.

    — 

    - Thomas Schnauz, writer for Breaking Bad speaks to Terry Gross about writing the finale.

    Schnauz joins us TODAY with writer/director Peter Gould and they talk about everything from the on-going ricin joke, to casting Saul Goodman, to their take on storytelling.

    Don’t miss it.

    (via nprfreshair)

  2. breaking bad

    fresh air