1. Posted on 29 September, 2014

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    nprfreshair:

    Lena Dunham, the creator and star of the HBO series Girls, has a new collection of personal essays called Not That Kind of Girl. She joined Fresh Air to talk about oversharing, feminism, OCD, and why she thinks most depictions of sex in movies are destructive.  

    Lena Dunham On Sex, Oversharing And Writing About Lost ‘Girls’

  2. lena dunham

    Girls

    HBO

    not that kind of girl

    Fresh Air

    oversharing

  1. Posted on 24 September, 2014

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    nprfreshair:

    When New York Times columnist Charles Blow was 7 years old, he was sexually abused by his cousin.  The traumatic experience sent him on a path of self-questioning in hopes of understanding how it happened, why it happened, and what it meant. His new memoir, Fire Shut Up in My Bones, is a unwavering account of his abuse and how he healed. 

    In the interview Blow discusses the correlation between victims of child sexual abuse and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender identity:

    "What the data shows us indisputably is that people who will later identify as LGBT have disproportionate rates of having been victims of child sexual abuse. So there are two ways to think of that — one of which I completely disagree with and one I agree more with.

    On the one end, the abuse is making these young people LGBT. The science for that is completely flimsy. I completely disagree with that idea. On the other side … children who will eventually identify as LGBT are more likely to be targets of sexual predators. If you think of it that way, it changes our concept of how we need to nurture and care for children who are different. …

    If you look at it that way you realize that in some cases, not all of course, in some cases the predator is targeting children who they already see as kind of having some kind of characteristics that will later be different. And that difference means they’re isolated. That difference means that they are already outside of the social mores, that the predator behavior is now somehow justified because this person is already outside the norm.”

    Photo: By Chad Batka, NYT 

  2. LGBT

    Charles Blow

    New York Times

    Bi-phobia

    Fresh Air

    Fire Shut Up in My Bones

  1. nprfreshair:

    Today André Benjamin, aka André 3000, joins us to talk about portraying legendary guitarist Jimi Hendrix in the new biopic, Jimi: All Is By My Side. 

    What was it like learning how to play like Hendrix?

    "I had to learn everything from playing behind my back to playing with my teeth to rolling around on the ground playing. I watched all the footage and I mimicked everything to a T, just to have it in the arsenal, just in case we needed it.

    One of the hardest parts [was] I’m a right-hand guitar player. I’m a horrible right-hand guitar player. I wouldn’t even call myself a guitar player; I just pick it up and fiddle with it every now and then. And I think any guitar player would agree with me, Jimi is the most comfortable-looking guitar player in the world. I’ve seen a lot of great guitarists that are probably much better skilled than Jimi Hendrix, but some players look like they’re doing a task or … putting in a lot of work, giving a lot of effort. One thing about Jimi, he never looked like it was uncomfortable to him. …

    When it came time to do the left-hand thing, I almost had to [do] finger choreography, learning where the chords are, learning the actual chords of the song with my left hand, learning where the notes are, learning how my fingers should lay. But it was really, really difficult, because it’s almost like walking backwards and making walking backwards look normal.”

    (Source: babeimgonnaleaveu)

  2. Jimi Hendrix

    andre benjamin

    jimi: all is by my side

    movies

    Fresh Air

  1. Posted on 23 September, 2014

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    nprfreshair:

Maureen Corrigan reviews The Paying Guests by Sarah Waters. The novel opens in 1922 in the ‘suburban backwater’ of London, where Frances Wray and her mother have fallen from the middle class and must take ‘paying guests’ into their home to stay afloat. 

"The Paying Guests is no simple period piece. As alert as Waters is to historical detail, she’s also a superb storyteller with a gift for capturing the layered nuances of character and mood. Any reader familiar with Waters’ earlier novels like Tipping the Velvet will know that she’s especially drawn to the subject of lesbian relationships. What’s so immediately compelling about our protagonist, Frances Wray, is that, in a way that doesn’t seem at all anachronistic, she’s comfortable in her own queer skin. It’s most of the rest of the world — and, tragically, some of the people in her own house — who have serious problems with Frances and her so-called “unnatural” sexuality.”

Girls playing ukuleles, 1926
 
View in High-Res

    nprfreshair:

    Maureen Corrigan reviews The Paying Guests by Sarah Waters. The novel opens in 1922 in the ‘suburban backwater’ of London, where Frances Wray and her mother have fallen from the middle class and must take ‘paying guests’ into their home to stay afloat. 

    "The Paying Guests is no simple period piece. As alert as Waters is to historical detail, she’s also a superb storyteller with a gift for capturing the layered nuances of character and mood. Any reader familiar with Waters’ earlier novels like Tipping the Velvet will know that she’s especially drawn to the subject of lesbian relationships. What’s so immediately compelling about our protagonist, Frances Wray, is that, in a way that doesn’t seem at all anachronistic, she’s comfortable in her own queer skin. It’s most of the rest of the world — and, tragically, some of the people in her own house — who have serious problems with Frances and her so-called “unnatural” sexuality.”

    Girls playing ukuleles, 1926

     

    (Source: back-then)

  2. maureen corrigan

    the paying guests

    sarah waters

    fresh air

  1. nprfreshair:

Today actor Ron Perlman (Sons of Anarchy, Hellboy) joins us to talk about his new memoir, Easy Street (The Hard Way).  In the interview he tells us about what it’s like acting under heavy prosthetic makeup:

"You look like you’re doing a lot of stuff because you’re covered, but the makeup is so seamless and so liquid. The more subtle you are, the more expressive you are. Everything you’re doing, even if you’re just thinking something without moving a muscle, it shows through. When I realized how little I had to do in prosthetic makeup and that the makeup was nothing more than an enhancement — an addition, another layer that added to the texture of the character — it was a liberating feeling for me."



View in High-Res

    nprfreshair:

    Today actor Ron Perlman (Sons of Anarchy, Hellboy) joins us to talk about his new memoir, Easy Street (The Hard Way).  In the interview he tells us about what it’s like acting under heavy prosthetic makeup:

    "You look like you’re doing a lot of stuff because you’re covered, but the makeup is so seamless and so liquid. The more subtle you are, the more expressive you are. Everything you’re doing, even if you’re just thinking something without moving a muscle, it shows through. When I realized how little I had to do in prosthetic makeup and that the makeup was nothing more than an enhancement — an addition, another layer that added to the texture of the character — it was a liberating feeling for me."

  2. Ron Perlman

    Fresh Air

    makeup

    acting

    hellboy

  1. Posted on 29 August, 2014

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    nprfreshair:

It has been a slow week of reruns, so this happened. 
View in High-Res

    nprfreshair:

    It has been a slow week of reruns, so this happened. 

  2. Fresh Air

    pie chart

    tumblr questions

    happy drums

  1. Posted on 26 August, 2014

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Last night Breaking Bad won its second consecutive prize for outstanding drama series.  Its star, Bryan Cranston, won his fifth Emmy. Fresh Air spoke to Cranston while he was on Broadway playing President Johnson in All the Way. In the interview, he tells Terry about his short-lived stand-up career: 

"I did it for about nine months in 1981, I believe it was. I did it solely for the purpose of overcoming fear, because I looked at that and I said to myself, "Oh, my God, that’s got to be the scariest thing to do." There’s a microphone and a light on you, and that’s it. It’s all you, and so I wanted to do that. I got into the idea of going from club to club. I was never paid for it, nor should I have been, because I never rose above the level of mediocrity. But it was a great, great experience, very humbling. My respect and admiration for those who do it for a living, like Jerry [Seinfeld], was just enormous."

Photo: Andreas Laszlo Konwrath via Variety 
View in High-Res

    nprfreshair:

    Last night Breaking Bad won its second consecutive prize for outstanding drama series.  Its star, Bryan Cranston, won his fifth Emmy. Fresh Air spoke to Cranston while he was on Broadway playing President Johnson in All the Way. In the interview, he tells Terry about his short-lived stand-up career: 

    "I did it for about nine months in 1981, I believe it was. I did it solely for the purpose of overcoming fear, because I looked at that and I said to myself, "Oh, my God, that’s got to be the scariest thing to do." There’s a microphone and a light on you, and that’s it. It’s all you, and so I wanted to do that. I got into the idea of going from club to club. I was never paid for it, nor should I have been, because I never rose above the level of mediocrity. But it was a great, great experience, very humbling. My respect and admiration for those who do it for a living, like Jerry [Seinfeld], was just enormous."

    Photo: Andreas Laszlo Konwrath via Variety 

  2. breaking bad

    Bryan Cranston

    Fresh Air

    Emmy

  1. Posted on 21 August, 2014

    554 notes | Permalink

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    nprfreshair:

FXX is going to have a 12-day Simpsons marathon, playing all 552 episodes.  In appreciation of the series, we’ve compiled several of our Simpsons interviews into one show. 
Since The Simpsons began, Fresh Air’s Terry Gross has interviewed many people who have had a hand creating the show – from Matt Groening in 1989 and 2003 to  two of the writers Al Jean and Mike Reiss in 1992. Gross also talked with actors who do the voices, including Nancy Cartwright, who plays Bart, in 2007; Julie Kavner, the voice of Marge in 1994; Hank Azaria, the voice of Moe, Apu, Chief Wiggum and others in 2004.
Here, Simpsons creator Matt Groening tells Terry about how they occasionally got in trouble with the Fox network: 

"At the beginning, virtually anything we did would get somebody upset and now it seems like the people who are eager to be offended — and this country is full of people who are eager to be offended. They’ve given up on our show. We got into trouble a few years ago for — Homer is watching an anti-drinking commercial and it said, "Warning! Beer causes rectal cancer." And Homer responds by saying, "Mmm beer." Fox didn’t want us to do that because beer advertisers are a big part of the Fox empire and it turns out the writer was able to track down the actual fact where some studies show that indeed it does — or did or has a tendency to [cause cancer] — so we were able to keep it in."

Photo: Courtesy of Fox 
View in High-Res

    nprfreshair:

    FXX is going to have a 12-day Simpsons marathon, playing all 552 episodes.  In appreciation of the series, we’ve compiled several of our Simpsons interviews into one show. 

    Since The Simpsons began, Fresh Air’s Terry Gross has interviewed many people who have had a hand creating the show – from Matt Groening in 1989 and 2003 to  two of the writers Al Jean and Mike Reiss in 1992. Gross also talked with actors who do the voices, including Nancy Cartwright, who plays Bart, in 2007; Julie Kavner, the voice of Marge in 1994; Hank Azaria, the voice of Moe, Apu, Chief Wiggum and others in 2004.

    Here, Simpsons creator Matt Groening tells Terry about how they occasionally got in trouble with the Fox network: 

    "At the beginning, virtually anything we did would get somebody upset and now it seems like the people who are eager to be offended — and this country is full of people who are eager to be offended. They’ve given up on our show. We got into trouble a few years ago for — Homer is watching an anti-drinking commercial and it said, "Warning! Beer causes rectal cancer." And Homer responds by saying, "Mmm beer." Fox didn’t want us to do that because beer advertisers are a big part of the Fox empire and it turns out the writer was able to track down the actual fact where some studies show that indeed it does — or did or has a tendency to [cause cancer] — so we were able to keep it in."

    Photo: Courtesy of Fox 

  2. simpsons

    fresh air

    the simpsons

  1. From Fresh Air, "The Women Behind ‘Obvious Child’ Talk Farts, Abortion And Stage Fright" View in High-Res

    From Fresh Air, "The Women Behind ‘Obvious Child’ Talk Farts, Abortion And Stage Fright"

  2. Fresh Air

    Jenny Slate

    Obvious Child

    movies

    Gilliam Robespierre

  1. via imgur View in High-Res

    via imgur

  2. fresh air

    terry gross