1. "The Turbulent Love Story Behind Yves Saint Laurent’s Revolutionary Rise" via Susan Stamberg
Image: Reg Lancaster/Getty Images View in High-Res

    "The Turbulent Love Story Behind Yves Saint Laurent’s Revolutionary Rise" via Susan Stamberg

    Image: Reg Lancaster/Getty Images

  2. Morning Edition

    susan stamberg

    fashion

    film

    yves saint laurent

  1. Posted on 25 March, 2014

    1,007 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from rollingstone

    rollingstone:

See how Wes Anderson and his crew created the meticulously detailed world of Grand Budapest Hotel in this exclusive featurette.
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    rollingstone:

    See how Wes Anderson and his crew created the meticulously detailed world of Grand Budapest Hotel in this exclusive featurette.

  2. film

    Wes Anderson

    Grand Budapest Hotel

  1. weareconstance:

    This new documentary, Everybody Street illuminates the lives and work of New York’s iconic street photographers and the incomparable city that has inspired them for decades. The documentary pays tribute to the spirit of street photography through a cinematic exploration of New York City, and captures the visceral rush, singular perseverance and at times immediate danger customary to these artists.

    Covering nine decades of street photography, Everybody Street explores the careers and influences of many notable photographers––a number of whom have never been documented, featuring: Bruce Davidson, Elliott Erwitt, Jill Freedman, Bruce Gilden, Joel Meyerowitz, Rebecca Lepkoff, Mary Ellen Mark, Jeff Mermelstein, Clayton Patterson, Ricky Powell, Jamel Shabazz, Martha Cooper, and Boogie, with historians Max Kozloff and Luc Sante.

    Dir. Cheryl Dunn

  2. documentary

    film

    new york city

  1. cartermagazine:

Today In History
‘Maya Angelou, esteemed poet and activist, premiered Georgia, Georgia on this date March 10, 1972 and became the first Black woman to have a motion picture produced.’
(photo: Maya Angelou)
- CARTER Magazine

    cartermagazine:

    Today In History

    ‘Maya Angelou, esteemed poet and activist, premiered Georgia, Georgia on this date March 10, 1972 and became the first Black woman to have a motion picture produced.’

    (photo: Maya Angelou)

    - CARTER Magazine

  2. maya angelou

    film

    history

  1. laughingsquid:

    Christopher Nolan’s Gritty ‘Dark Knight’ Trilogy Recut as a Comedy Film

  2. film

    farce

    funny

  1. tballardbrown:

    These are the big movies that changed how we thought about our government.

  2. film

    movies

    politics

  1. Posted on 22 January, 2014

    5,193 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from micdotcom

    policymic:

Sorry young women, the Oscars don’t represent you

An LA Times study found that Academy Award voters are 94% Caucasian, 77% male and have a median age of 62. Men make up 90% of five branches from cinematography to writing, and of the 43 board governors, only six are women. It makes me wonder, if more young people were members of the Academy, might the Oscar nominations change?
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    policymic:

    Sorry young women, the Oscars don’t represent you

    An LA Times study found that Academy Award voters are 94% Caucasian, 77% male and have a median age of 62. Men make up 90% of five branches from cinematography to writing, and of the 43 board governors, only six are women. It makes me wonder, if more young people were members of the Academy, might the Oscar nominations change?

    Read more

    Follow policymic on Tumblr

    (Source: micdotcom)

  2. movies

    film

    Oscars

    Academy Awards

  1. Posted on 16 January, 2014

    466 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from newyorker

    It’s easy to look back at a year of films and say that only the good films should have been made, but that’s like saying that venture capitalists should fund only the Twitters and Googles and not bother with anyone else. It just doesn’t work that way.

    — Tim Wu explains why we need so many indie films: http://nyr.kr/1d6kJs6 (via newyorker)

  2. film

    indie film

    independent film

  1. They’re kind of the big, lovable lunkhead in a high-school class full of pretentious strivers. You can sit back and look at the pretty dresses and wait for somebody to make a really unbalanced speech — or for McConaughey to make a speech that so perfectly captures his essence that he could probably now retire — because this ceremony asks for nothing more. It does not ask for respect, and doesn’t get any. For a show like Brooklyn Nine-Nine that’s good but not yet great, it’s a boost that might give it more space to grow, and it’s one more chance to cheer for Breaking Bad, and it’s a really good thing that 12 Years a Slave won that last award, because up until then, it was starting to look like the HFPA didn’t actually see it.

  2. Golden Globes

    Hollywood

    film

    movies

    HPFA

  1. A few months ago, when I popped in Mary Poppins for the first time in decades, I expected to find it had only appreciated in value; after all, the other Julie Andrews singing spectacular from 1965, The Sound of Music, gets even better if you watch it again as a grown-up, since you’re more likely to fully appreciate the performances by Andrews, Christopher Plummer, and Eleanor Parker as the Baroness (not to mention that wonderfully tender ballad between the film’s two grown-up lovers, “Something Good”). The Sound of Music is sturdily structured and well-cast down to its smallest roles; rewatching it now, there’s really not a superfluous scene.

    Not so much with Mary Poppins, y’all.

  2. film

    musicals

    classics

    Mary Poppins

    Disney