1. Posted on 26 November, 2013

    208 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from wnyc

    wnyc:

“I would speak to one manager, and they would be like, ‘Hold on a second, I have to ask to this other manager if we’re going to use you,’  finally someone picked up and would say, ‘Yes, we are using you,’ or, ‘No, we’re not going to use you.’” 
Zyad Hammad, In New Economy, Employers Expect “Open Availability”
View in High-Res

    wnyc:

    “I would speak to one manager, and they would be like, ‘Hold on a second, I have to ask to this other manager if we’re going to use you,’  finally someone picked up and would say, ‘Yes, we are using you,’ or, ‘No, we’re not going to use you.’” 

    Zyad Hammad, In New Economy, Employers Expect “Open Availability”

  2. wnyc

    economy

  1. Who earns the minimum wage? Here’s the answer, in three graphs View in High-Res

    Who earns the minimum wage? Here’s the answer, in three graphs

  2. minimum wage

    economy

  1. I think that one really big thing about the millennial generation is that we are going to have so many different careers over a lifetime. And that fluidity also translates into what our work structure looks like.

    — How the Sharing Economy is Changing the Places We Work

  2. economy

    millennials

  1. Everyone the U.S. Government Owes Money To, in One Graph (via Planet Money) View in High-Res

    Everyone the U.S. Government Owes Money To, in One Graph (via Planet Money)

  2. economy

    planet money

  1. A new poll of African Americans found optimism about the future despite the economy and unemployment, which have hit blacks especially hard. (It also had some interesting findings about the way men and women feel about long-term relationships — and they’re probably not what you’d expect.)

  2. Code Switch

    race

    African American

    black

    economy

    relationships

  1. Even before Benghazi, the IRS and the Department of Justice controversies started heating up, the economy had consistently taken a back seat to issues such as immigration and gun control.

    "The economy is by far the most important issue for voters," says Karlyn Bowman, a polling expert at the American Enterprise Institute. "It’s not unusual for Washington preoccupations to be different than those of the public."

    She says that the public is skeptical that Washington can provide economic answers at this point. Politicians themselves seem a little dubious.

    — Whatever Happened To The Economy?

  2. economy

    money

    jobs

    C.R.E.A.M.

  1. The population explosion in Williston, N.D., has been a blessing and a curse for many businesses.
via The Downsides Of Living In An Oil Boom Town
Photo: Meg Luther Lindholm for NPR View in High-Res

    The population explosion in Williston, N.D., has been a blessing and a curse for many businesses.

    via The Downsides Of Living In An Oil Boom Town

    Photo: Meg Luther Lindholm for NPR

  2. jobs

    economy

  1. Posted on 27 August, 2012

    134 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from theatlantic

    theatlantic:

America’s Housing Trap: How Young Homeowners Lost Out by Buying

Last week, the real estate researchers at Zillow released their report on underwater homeowners — those who owe more on their mortgage than their house is worth — for the second quarter of 2012. They estimate that 48 percent of mortgage borrowers younger than 40 are currently underwater. It’s 39 percent among those who are 20-24 years old; 48 percent for the 25-29 cohort; and 51 percent for the 30-34 demographic. Overall, they’re more likely to be underwater than middle aged and elderly owners, a result of the fact that many Millennials were buying at the peak of the housing boom.

Read more. [Image: Zillow]
View in High-Res

    theatlantic:

    America’s Housing Trap: How Young Homeowners Lost Out by Buying

    Last week, the real estate researchers at Zillow released their report on underwater homeowners — those who owe more on their mortgage than their house is worth — for the second quarter of 2012. They estimate that 48 percent of mortgage borrowers younger than 40 are currently underwater. It’s 39 percent among those who are 20-24 years old; 48 percent for the 25-29 cohort; and 51 percent for the 30-34 demographic. Overall, they’re more likely to be underwater than middle aged and elderly owners, a result of the fact that many Millennials were buying at the peak of the housing boom.

    Read more. [Image: Zillow]

  2. housing boom

    housing bust

    mortgage

    finance

    economy

  1. nprradiopictures:

    Tens of millions of Americans are still struggling, despite the slow economic recovery. NPR’s Pam Fessler begins a four-part series on All Things Considered looking at poverty in the US and how some organizations are helping families stay afloat.

  2. poverty

    economy

  1. Posted on 13 June, 2012

    317 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from tballardbrown

    tballardbrown:

In sworn court testimony, she described watching loan officers comb through heavily African American areas such as Baltimore and Prince George’s County, forging relationships with churches and community groups to sell their members shoddy mortgages. She says she processed loans for homeowners with sterling credit ratings with higher interest rates than they needed to pay. And she says she pumped out millions of dollars in mortgages to people with no paperwork and low incomes, becoming Wells Fargo’s top-producing loan officer.
(via Ex-loan officer claims Wells Fargo targeted black communities for shoddy loans - The Washington Post)
Photo: Michael Williamson / Washington Post
View in High-Res

    tballardbrown:

    In sworn court testimony, she described watching loan officers comb through heavily African American areas such as Baltimore and Prince George’s County, forging relationships with churches and community groups to sell their members shoddy mortgages. She says she processed loans for homeowners with sterling credit ratings with higher interest rates than they needed to pay. And she says she pumped out millions of dollars in mortgages to people with no paperwork and low incomes, becoming Wells Fargo’s top-producing loan officer.

    (via Ex-loan officer claims Wells Fargo targeted black communities for shoddy loans - The Washington Post)

    Photo: Michael Williamson / Washington Post

  2. housing

    mortgages

    wall street

    banks

    economy