1. Posted on 25 March, 2014

    720 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from artnet

    artnet:

The original king of the selfie, Andy Warhol. We’ve rounded up some of the best art world selfies, check it out on news.artnet.com
View in High-Res

    artnet:

    The original king of the selfie, Andy Warhol. We’ve rounded up some of the best art world selfies, check it out on news.artnet.com

  2. selfie

    warhol

    andy warhol

    photography

    art

  1. Posted on 24 March, 2014

    3,538 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from wetheurban

    wetheurban:

    SPOTLIGHT: 3D Wooden Street Art by Joe Lurato

    Today we’re delighted to bring you a selection of beautiful street art creations by American artist Joe Lurato, based in New Jersey, who populates the city with small wooden characters, thus creating some great illusions and trompes l’oeil!

    Read More

    These are gorgeous. — tanya b.

  2. art

    street art

    wood

    wooden art

  1. Posted on 13 March, 2014

    153 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from clutchmag

    The Politics of Black Womanhood Illustrated Through Art

    clutchmag:

    The Politics of Black Womanhood Illustrated Through Art

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    Kosisochukwu Nnebe is Nigerian-Canadian who’s latest project is currently on display at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts as part of their Black History Month program until March 30. Nnebe’s project focuses on the identity of the modern black woman.

    According to Nnebe, her project is divided into three parts:

    The first part consists of layered paintings on plexiglass that show different…

    View On WordPress

  2. black womanhood

    art

    Kosisochukwu Nnebe

  1. Posted on 24 February, 2014

    137 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from nprbooks

    nprbooks:

We gave you a little taste last week, and now the full piece is up on NPR’s Code Switch blog: award-winning comic artist Afua Richardson’s lovely rendering of the Langston Hughes poem, “The Negro Speaks of Rivers.”
Stay tuned; we’re winding down Black History Month in style with two more artists — the great Brian Stelfreeze and the equally great Kyle Baker!
- Petra
View in High-Res

    nprbooks:

    We gave you a little taste last week, and now the full piece is up on NPR’s Code Switch blog: award-winning comic artist Afua Richardson’s lovely rendering of the Langston Hughes poem, “The Negro Speaks of Rivers.”

    Stay tuned; we’re winding down Black History Month in style with two more artists — the great Brian Stelfreeze and the equally great Kyle Baker!

    - Petra

  2. art

    black history

    black history month

    Afua Richardson

  1. sheilastansbury:

(via Seeing Themselves: Photographers’ Self-Portraits : The New Yorker)
Photo: Deana Lawson
View in High-Res

    sheilastansbury:

    (via Seeing Themselves: Photographers’ Self-Portraits : The New Yorker)

    Photo: Deana Lawson

  2. photography

    photographers

    art

    self-portraits

  1. tballardbrown:

This Guy Gives People Cartoon Faces on His Train Ride to Work « via TwistedSifter

    tballardbrown:

    This Guy Gives People Cartoon Faces on His Train Ride to Work « via TwistedSifter

  2. art

    doodles

    commute relief

    comic relief

  1. Every day, illustrator Maria Fabrizio posts a news-inspired image on her Wordless News blog. This week, all of her pictures will be inspired by stories she hears on Morning Edition.
Today, Debbie Elliott’s story caught her ear: It’s about a federal judge in Little Rock, Ark., who is considering a deal that would end one of the longest running and most notorious school desegregation cases in the country. View in High-Res

    Every day, illustrator Maria Fabrizio posts a news-inspired image on her Wordless News blog. This week, all of her pictures will be inspired by stories she hears on Morning Edition.

    Today, Debbie Elliott’s story caught her ear: It’s about a federal judge in Little Rock, Ark., who is considering a deal that would end one of the longest running and most notorious school desegregation cases in the country.

  2. Wordless News

    segregation

    illustration

    art

    news

    Maria Fabrizio

  1. An original production cel from Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids. The show was among a burst of 1970s-era Saturday morning cartoons that featured positive African-American characters.
Courtesy of Pamela Thomas/Museum of UnCut Funk!
Hey Hey Hey! Historian Draws Attention To ’70s Black Animation Art Pamela Thomas grew up during the 1970s watching cartoons that featured African-American characters. Now, she relives her childhood Saturday mornings through her collection of black animation art on display at the Museum of UnCut Funk! View in High-Res

    An original production cel from Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids. The show was among a burst of 1970s-era Saturday morning cartoons that featured positive African-American characters.

    Courtesy of Pamela Thomas/Museum of UnCut Funk!

    Hey Hey Hey! Historian Draws Attention To ’70s Black Animation Art
    Pamela Thomas grew up during the 1970s watching cartoons that featured African-American characters. Now, she relives her childhood Saturday mornings through her collection of black animation art on display at the Museum of UnCut Funk!

  2. Museum of UnCut Funk!

    art

    history

    animation

    black animation

    Fat Albert

    bill cosby

    Brown Hornet

    Harlem Globetrotters

    Jackson 5ive

    cartoons

  1. (via Texas: Prada Marfa is illegal roadside ad)

The Prada Marfa art installation has stood alone in the West Texas plains for eight years, its high-end Italian fashion goods available to no one.
Now, state officials say the shack-sized building along a rural U.S. highway near Marfa is an illegal roadside advertisement, and they’re considering what to do about a structure that’s a must-see for passing tourists and a must-hit for vandals.
Artists Michael Elmgreen and Ingar Dragset designed the piece to resemble a Prada storefront and slowly disintegrate. It went up in 2005 on private land in Valentine, Texas.
…
[Boyd Elder, a local artist and Prada Marfa site representative] said the idea was originally to place the installation along a highway that leads to Las Vegas.
"It was going to be called Prada Nevada, but then someone suggested we put it in Valentine, and we all laughed," he recalls. "It was a joke to put it in the middle of nowhere."
Since it opened, vandals have hit the store numerous times, including a break-in where thieves discovered the bags — which sell for hundreds of dollars — had the bottoms removed and only the right shoe of each pair was on display. The window panes were eventually replaced with bullet-resistant polycarbonate.

Photo: Matt Slocum/AP View in High-Res

    (via Texas: Prada Marfa is illegal roadside ad)

    The Prada Marfa art installation has stood alone in the West Texas plains for eight years, its high-end Italian fashion goods available to no one.

    Now, state officials say the shack-sized building along a rural U.S. highway near Marfa is an illegal roadside advertisement, and they’re considering what to do about a structure that’s a must-see for passing tourists and a must-hit for vandals.

    Artists Michael Elmgreen and Ingar Dragset designed the piece to resemble a Prada storefront and slowly disintegrate. It went up in 2005 on private land in Valentine, Texas.

    [Boyd Elder, a local artist and Prada Marfa site representative] said the idea was originally to place the installation along a highway that leads to Las Vegas.

    "It was going to be called Prada Nevada, but then someone suggested we put it in Valentine, and we all laughed," he recalls. "It was a joke to put it in the middle of nowhere."

    Since it opened, vandals have hit the store numerous times, including a break-in where thieves discovered the bags — which sell for hundreds of dollars — had the bottoms removed and only the right shoe of each pair was on display. The window panes were eventually replaced with bullet-resistant polycarbonate.

    Photo: Matt Slocum/AP

  2. art

    marfa

  1. Posted on 1 May, 2013

    759 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from nprradiopictures

    nprradiopictures:

    Before the age of computers and vinyl printers, sign painters worked by hand to illustrate storefronts, billboards and banners. Local craftsmen often developed a signature style that could distinguish a neighborhood, or even a city.

    But technology made creating signs less expensive — and less expressive. Sign Painters, a new book and documentary written and directed by Faythe Levine and Sam Macon, focuses on dozens of artists who are keeping the art alive.

    Before Macon began working on the film, he said never thought much about sign painting.

    “I had never really given any thought to the fact that this is someone’s job, and the fact that individuals across America were painting signs regionally that defined the way the United States looked,” Macon told NPR’s Neal Conan.

    Once word got out about the project in the sign-painting community, they were flooded with personal stories. “We were totally inundated in the best way, and we ended up having more content than we could track down,” Macon said.

    ‘Sign Painters’: A Close-Up Focus On An Endangered Art

    Video Credit: Faythe Levine & Sam Macon

  2. art

    signs