1. Imagine the U.S. government saying to the people living around  Yellowstone, “You know what? All those wild animals in the park — the  grizzlies, the bison, the wolves — they belong to you.” This is exactly  what the government of Namibia has done in a radical experiment to save  wildlife — and the people who share their land.
Hear the full story here: To Save Wildlife, Namibia’s Farmers Take Control
 TIMELINE: Namibia’s Checkered History Of Conservation
Photo Credit: John W. Poole, Christopher Joyce, Vikki Valentine / NPR
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    Imagine the U.S. government saying to the people living around Yellowstone, “You know what? All those wild animals in the park — the grizzlies, the bison, the wolves — they belong to you.” This is exactly what the government of Namibia has done in a radical experiment to save wildlife — and the people who share their land.

    Hear the full story here: To Save Wildlife, Namibia’s Farmers Take Control

    Photo Credit: John W. Poole, Christopher Joyce, Vikki Valentine / NPR

    • namibia

      wildlife preservation

    1. theafricatheynevershowyou:

      By Femi Adewunmi

      The latest Global Competitiveness Index for 2011-2012, published by the World Economic Forum, shows that Sub-Saharan African countries have their work cut out to make the region more competitive.

      Although some African countries have made progress with respect to national competitiveness, the region still lags behind the rest of the world. From a total of 142 countries, only three Sub-Saharan African countries, namely South AfricaMauritius and Rwanda, feature in the top half of the rankings. Among the bottom 20 economies, 13 are from Africa.

      The World Economic Forum defines competitiveness as “the set of institutions, policies, and factors that determine the level of productivity of a country. The level of productivity, in turn, sets the level of prosperity that can be earned by an economy. The productivity level also determines the rates of return obtained by investments in an economy, which in turn are the fundamental drivers of its growth rates. In other words, a more competitive economy is one that is likely to grow faster over time.”

      Sub-Saharan Africa’s ten most competitive countries are:

      1. South Africa
      2011-2012 overall ranking: 50
      2010-2011 overall ranking: 54

      2. Mauritius
      2011-2012 overall ranking: 54
      2010-2011 overall ranking: 55

      3. Rwanda
      2011-2012 overall ranking: 70
      2010-2011 overall ranking: 80

      4. Botswana
      2011-2012 overall ranking: 80
      2010-2011 overall ranking: 76

      5. Namibia
      2011-2012 overall ranking: 83
      2010-2011 overall ranking: 74

      6. The Gambia
      2011-2012 overall ranking: 99
      2010-2011 overall ranking: 90

      7. Kenya
      2011-2012 overall ranking: 102
      2010-2011 overall ranking: 106

      8. Benin
      2011-2012 overall ranking: 104
      2010-2011 overall ranking: 103

      9. Ethiopia
      2011-2012 overall ranking: 106
      2010-2011 overall ranking: 119

      10. Senegal
      2011-2012 overall ranking: 111
      2010-2011 overall ranking: 104


      And here’s a link to the whole WEF report.

    2. Femi Adewunmi

      World Economic Forumn

      Africa

      economics

      economy

      South Africa

      Mauritius

      Rwanda

      Botswana

      Namibia

      Gambia

      Kenya

      Benin

      Ethiopia

      Senegal