1. Posted on 15 May, 2013

    665 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from fastcompany

    fastcompany:

The Takeaway: Don’t let critics destroy a great idea.
The three women behind the THINX, a fashionable underwear line designed for a woman’s menstrual cycle, wanted to launch an untested idea in a field dominated by corporate giants like Hanes, Fruit of the Loom, and Victoria’s Secret.
After a few years of perseverance and research, THINX products are beginning to hit store shelves, and early sales have already eclipsed this year’s projections.
Here’s the scoop.
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    fastcompany:

    The Takeaway: Don’t let critics destroy a great idea.

    The three women behind the THINX, a fashionable underwear line designed for a woman’s menstrual cycle, wanted to launch an untested idea in a field dominated by corporate giants like Hanes, Fruit of the Loom, and Victoria’s Secret.

    After a few years of perseverance and research, THINX products are beginning to hit store shelves, and early sales have already eclipsed this year’s projections.

    Here’s the scoop.

  2. ideas

    underwear

    innovation

    research

  1. emergentfutures:

No More Car Crashes by 2020?
The leading cause of car accidents is pretty obvious – its human error. Whether its drunk driving, distracted driving, or aggressive driving, it all comes back to the person behind the wheel. Less than 20% of accidents are caused by road or mechanical failure, so the only way to truly make driving safer for everyone is to give the person behind the wheel more tools to drive safely – or even remove the human element altogether.
Here are five things that can put us on a path to ZERO human error car crashes by 2020:
Full Story: Innovaro

    emergentfutures:

    No More Car Crashes by 2020?

    The leading cause of car accidents is pretty obvious – its human error. Whether its drunk driving, distracted driving, or aggressive driving, it all comes back to the person behind the wheel. Less than 20% of accidents are caused by road or mechanical failure, so the only way to truly make driving safer for everyone is to give the person behind the wheel more tools to drive safely – or even remove the human element altogether.

    Here are five things that can put us on a path to ZERO human error car crashes by 2020:

    Full Story: Innovaro

  2. innovation

    cars

    automobiles

  1. Posted on 28 August, 2012

    286 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from nasdaq

    nasdaq:

Now this is what we call innovative preservation!  According to WIRED, Jeremy Mayer takes old typewriters and, rather than throwing them all out, makes them into creative designs, a process that he calls “cold assembly.”  Impressive stuff!
View in High-Res

    nasdaq:

    Now this is what we call innovative preservation!  According to WIRED, Jeremy Mayer takes old typewriters and, rather than throwing them all out, makes them into creative designs, a process that he calls “cold assembly.”  Impressive stuff!

  2. design

    innovation

  1. "The Tesla electric car company has high hopes for its new Model S, which it calls ‘the world’s first premium electric sedan.’ The new car, which is being delivered to customers Friday, is priced at around half the cost of the only other Tesla model, the svelte, two-door Roadster …”

    READ MORE 

    (Source: npr)

  2. npr

    cars

    innovation

    technology

    Tesla

  1. Posted on 19 October, 2011

    170 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from theatlantic

    Introducing Start-Up Nation by The Atlantic #StartupSouth
We’re running a special report for the next few weeks focusing on innovation and invention across America. Technology editor Alexis Madrigal is road-tripping through the south in search of the next Silicon Valley south of the Mason-Dixon line.
Click through to explore our interactive map (here’s a guide to getting the most out of it) and join the conversation with the tag #StartupSouth on Twitter and Tumblr. 


View in High-Res

    Introducing Start-Up Nation by The Atlantic #StartupSouth

    We’re running a special report for the next few weeks focusing on innovation and invention across America. Technology editor Alexis Madrigal is road-tripping through the south in search of the next Silicon Valley south of the Mason-Dixon line.

    Click through to explore our interactive map (here’s a guide to getting the most out of it) and join the conversation with the tag #StartupSouth on Twitter and Tumblr. 

  2. StartupSouth

    innovation

    invention

  1. Posted on 15 September, 2011

    149 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from csmonitor

    csmonitor:

PHOTO: Repliee Q2 (r.) reacted as student Motoko Noma touched her face at a Tokyo exhibition in 2006. The android represents strides in adaptive machine systems that have continued to advance. (Kiyosha Ota/Reuters/File)
READ: Uncanny Valley: Will we ever learn to live with artificial humans?
Creepy. as. all. get. out.
 

    csmonitor:

    PHOTO: Repliee Q2 (r.) reacted as student Motoko Noma touched her face at a Tokyo exhibition in 2006. The android represents strides in adaptive machine systems that have continued to advance. (Kiyosha Ota/Reuters/File)

    READ: Uncanny Valley: Will we ever learn to live with artificial humans?

    Creepy. as. all. get. out.

     

  2. Technology

    Innovation

    Japan

    Androids

    Business

  1. washingtonpostinnovations:

Social sharing, via QR
This Sunday, The Washington Post did a twist on the old QR codes we’ve been putting in the paper. Instead of sending our weekend readers to more Web content or features from a quick QR scan, we sent them straight to a Facebook sharing link. The idea was to pick a story that we thought readers of the Sunday printed product would want to share in the moment. We used Eli Saslow’s piece on a Somali American man whose nephew joined the extremist al-Shabab group, and who now tries to keep others from the lure of jihad. Our logic in launching this was simple: It’s Sunday, we know you’re busy and might never get to your desktop computer to share this. But perhaps you’ve got your smartphone handy to scan a QR code. 
Cory Haik / Deputy editor, Universal News 
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    washingtonpostinnovations:

    Social sharing, via QR

    This Sunday, The Washington Post did a twist on the old QR codes we’ve been putting in the paper. Instead of sending our weekend readers to more Web content or features from a quick QR scan, we sent them straight to a Facebook sharing link. The idea was to pick a story that we thought readers of the Sunday printed product would want to share in the moment. We used Eli Saslow’s piece on a Somali American man whose nephew joined the extremist al-Shabab group, and who now tries to keep others from the lure of jihad. Our logic in launching this was simple: It’s Sunday, we know you’re busy and might never get to your desktop computer to share this. But perhaps you’ve got your smartphone handy to scan a QR code. 

    Cory Haik / Deputy editor, Universal News 

  2. storytelling

    QR

    news

    innovation