1. Photos courtesy of Lawrie Brown 

    "Tasting With Our Eyes: Why Bright Blue Chicken Looks So Strange"

    There’s something unsettling — freakish, even, about Lawrie Brown’s photos of everyday meals.

  2. Lawrie Brown

    Food

    Science

    the Salt

  1. Posted on 27 February, 2014

    221 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from npr8

    npr8:

There’s nothing like coming home to a delicious dinner after a chilly nine miles in the dark!
Photo (and dinner) courtesy of Corinne Fortin.

Running and food really are inseparable. View in High-Res

    npr8:

    There’s nothing like coming home to a delicious dinner after a chilly nine miles in the dark!

    Photo (and dinner) courtesy of Corinne Fortin.

    Running and food really are inseparable.

  2. npr8

    food

    boston marathon

    running

  1. Dan Charles/NPR
In the U.S., “GMO-free” means that something contains no more than 0.9 percent GMOs. View in High-Res

    Dan Charles/NPR

    In the U.S., “GMO-free” means that something contains no more than 0.9 percent GMOs.

  2. GMO

    Food

  1. Like Airbnb for foodies, a new trend allows diners to enjoy fine meals inside someone’s home.

  2. dinner with strangers

    food

    dining

  1. BBC/YouTube

    "Spinach Dinosaurs To Sugar Diamonds: 3-D Printers Hit The Kitchen" via Michaeleen Doucleff.

  2. Food

    Science

    3-D Printing

  1. Posted on 1 November, 2013

    185 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from theatlantic

    theatlantic:

Can Fish Sauce be Vietnam’s Champagne?

Cuong Pham’s family left Vietnam by boat in 1979, after his father’s association with U.S. agencies during the war made it too “difficult” to continue living there. Three decades later, Cuong returned to Phu Quoc, an island off the country’s southern coast, to make fish sauce.
Fish sauce is the essential condiment of Southeast Asian cuisine. Made from fermented anchovies, it gives Vietnamese and Thai dishes their distinctive sweet-sour taste. More than 95% of Vietnamese households use fish sauce daily, tossing it into everything from noodles to dipping sauce.
In previous decades, housewives bought unmarked jars at the local market. Today, they’ve developed fierce brand loyalty. Three sauces manufactured by Masan Consumer Corp. make up 76% of the domestic market, which this year is forecast to top $400 million. New York-based private equity firm KKR recently increased its stake in Masan to $359 million—the largest investment a private equity firm has ever made in Vietnam.
But Cuong and the other approximately 90 Phu Quoc producers want consumers to see their fermented condiment as much more than a household staple.
Read more. [Image: Nguyen Huy Kham/Reuters]

View in High-Res

    theatlantic:

    Can Fish Sauce be Vietnam’s Champagne?

    Cuong Pham’s family left Vietnam by boat in 1979, after his father’s association with U.S. agencies during the war made it too “difficult” to continue living there. Three decades later, Cuong returned to Phu Quoc, an island off the country’s southern coast, to make fish sauce.

    Fish sauce is the essential condiment of Southeast Asian cuisine. Made from fermented anchovies, it gives Vietnamese and Thai dishes their distinctive sweet-sour taste. More than 95% of Vietnamese households use fish sauce daily, tossing it into everything from noodles to dipping sauce.

    In previous decades, housewives bought unmarked jars at the local market. Today, they’ve developed fierce brand loyalty. Three sauces manufactured by Masan Consumer Corp. make up 76% of the domestic market, which this year is forecast to top $400 million. New York-based private equity firm KKR recently increased its stake in Masan to $359 million—the largest investment a private equity firm has ever made in Vietnam.

    But Cuong and the other approximately 90 Phu Quoc producers want consumers to see their fermented condiment as much more than a household staple.

    Read more. [Image: Nguyen Huy Kham/Reuters]

  2. fish sauce

    vietnamese

    food

  1. Related: The NYPL Menu Collection

  2. food

    restaurants

    menus

    digital menus

  1. Candy is the one that says, ‘Hey, this is a treat. This isn’t really food.’ Candy never says, ‘It’s fiber, it’s vitamins, it’s all-natural, it’s good for you!’ Candy is honest, and says, ‘This is a treat. Look at it as a treat. Enjoy it as a treat.’

    — 

    A Rutgers University professor explains our obsession with candy

    "I talk to other people, and women especially talk a lot about candy in … a language of sin and guilt and temptation and the sort of penance of the salad. Like, if you fall into the sin of a Snickers bar at lunchtime, you can do penance with salad at dinner," she says.

  2. candy

    halloween

    food

  1. fish sauce

    food

  1. (via National Flags Created From the Foods Each Country Is Commonly Associated With)
I continue to use my food lens when looking for posts. These flags from Australian advertising agency WHYBIN\TBWAT were created to promote the Sydney International Food Festival. The flags use foods native to each nation: basil, pasta and tomatoes on Italy’s flag, Kalamata olives and feta cheese for Greece, tuna and rice for Japan. (That’s France with cheese and grapes.) — heidi View in High-Res

    (via National Flags Created From the Foods Each Country Is Commonly Associated With)

    I continue to use my food lens when looking for posts. These flags from Australian advertising agency WHYBIN\TBWAT were created to promote the Sydney International Food Festival. The flags use foods native to each nation: basil, pasta and tomatoes on Italy’s flag, Kalamata olives and feta cheese for Greece, tuna and rice for Japan. (That’s France with cheese and grapes.) — heidi

  2. food