1. $1,845

    — The price of a Playstation 4 in Brazil. Here’s why. 

  2. playstation 4

    sony

    brazil

    economics

  1. Upon rereading the book recently, I took special note of Gatsby’s spending habits. He’s described as a wealthy man, but he’s still living a very tony lifestyle for someone who made most of his money bootlegging. One over-the-top party, yes. But an over-the-top party every weekend? Even hedge-funders don’t live like that.
So I pulled every nugget from The Great Gatsby related to Gatsby’s personal wealth and income, and every passage that detailed his spending, and — with the help of some experts — tried to re-create a historical ledger that might have shown the state of Jay Gatsby’s fortune, if he had been a real person and not a figment of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s imagination. It turns out that, far from accumulating vast stores of wealth, Jay Gatsby might have been spending beyond his means.
— Was the Great Gatsby Broke? — Daily Intelligencer View in High-Res

    Upon rereading the book recently, I took special note of Gatsby’s spending habits. He’s described as a wealthy man, but he’s still living a very tony lifestyle for someone who made most of his money bootlegging. One over-the-top party, yes. But an over-the-top party every weekend? Even hedge-funders don’t live like that.

    So I pulled every nugget from The Great Gatsby related to Gatsby’s personal wealth and income, and every passage that detailed his spending, and — with the help of some experts — tried to re-create a historical ledger that might have shown the state of Jay Gatsby’s fortune, if he had been a real person and not a figment of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s imagination. It turns out that, far from accumulating vast stores of wealth, Jay Gatsby might have been spending beyond his means.

    Was the Great Gatsby Broke? — Daily Intelligencer

  2. gatsby

    the great gatsby

    economics

    money

    c.r.e.a.m.

  1. The No BS! Brass Band from Richmond, VA turns has turned economics into song. NPR’s Robert Smith—with the band’s accompaniment—reports on figures from the ISM Manufacturing Index, a tool helpful in gauging the U.S. economic outlook.
Listen to the story here. — rachel
Photo: Flickr View in High-Res

    The No BS! Brass Band from Richmond, VA turns has turned economics into song. NPR’s Robert Smith—with the band’s accompaniment—reports on figures from the ISM Manufacturing Index, a tool helpful in gauging the U.S. economic outlook.

    Listen to the story here. — rachel

    Photo: Flickr

  2. NPR

    music

    economics

  1. Posted on 1 June, 2012

    130 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from planetmoney

    planetmoney:

An awful recovery just entered its fourth year. This is what the current picture looks like. 

    planetmoney:

    An awful recovery just entered its fourth year. This is what the current picture looks like. 

  2. news

    economy

    economics

    Planet Money

    NPR

  1. Posted on 26 March, 2012

    199 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from planetmoney

    planetmoney:

First, we published a few minimalist economics posters that we cooked up ourselves. Then, we published posters that readers sent in. Now, we bring you minimalist econ posters by actual economists.

    planetmoney:

    First, we published a few minimalist economics posters that we cooked up ourselves. Then, we published posters that readers sent in. Now, we bring you minimalist econ posters by actual economists.

  2. economics

  1. secretrepublic:

The Suburbanization of Poverty: An Infographic
View in High-Res

    secretrepublic:

    The Suburbanization of Poverty: An Infographic

  2. Infographic

    Poverty

    Suburbia

    Economics

  1. theafricatheynevershowyou:

    By Femi Adewunmi

    The latest Global Competitiveness Index for 2011-2012, published by the World Economic Forum, shows that Sub-Saharan African countries have their work cut out to make the region more competitive.

    Although some African countries have made progress with respect to national competitiveness, the region still lags behind the rest of the world. From a total of 142 countries, only three Sub-Saharan African countries, namely South AfricaMauritius and Rwanda, feature in the top half of the rankings. Among the bottom 20 economies, 13 are from Africa.

    The World Economic Forum defines competitiveness as “the set of institutions, policies, and factors that determine the level of productivity of a country. The level of productivity, in turn, sets the level of prosperity that can be earned by an economy. The productivity level also determines the rates of return obtained by investments in an economy, which in turn are the fundamental drivers of its growth rates. In other words, a more competitive economy is one that is likely to grow faster over time.”

    Sub-Saharan Africa’s ten most competitive countries are:

    1. South Africa
    2011-2012 overall ranking: 50
    2010-2011 overall ranking: 54

    2. Mauritius
    2011-2012 overall ranking: 54
    2010-2011 overall ranking: 55

    3. Rwanda
    2011-2012 overall ranking: 70
    2010-2011 overall ranking: 80

    4. Botswana
    2011-2012 overall ranking: 80
    2010-2011 overall ranking: 76

    5. Namibia
    2011-2012 overall ranking: 83
    2010-2011 overall ranking: 74

    6. The Gambia
    2011-2012 overall ranking: 99
    2010-2011 overall ranking: 90

    7. Kenya
    2011-2012 overall ranking: 102
    2010-2011 overall ranking: 106

    8. Benin
    2011-2012 overall ranking: 104
    2010-2011 overall ranking: 103

    9. Ethiopia
    2011-2012 overall ranking: 106
    2010-2011 overall ranking: 119

    10. Senegal
    2011-2012 overall ranking: 111
    2010-2011 overall ranking: 104


    And here’s a link to the whole WEF report.

  2. Femi Adewunmi

    World Economic Forumn

    Africa

    economics

    economy

    South Africa

    Mauritius

    Rwanda

    Botswana

    Namibia

    Gambia

    Kenya

    Benin

    Ethiopia

    Senegal