1. Posted on 13 March, 2014

    1,542 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from fastcompany

    fastcompany:

Flat Maps Don’t Tell The Whole Story: View The World’s Cities In 3-D
From London to New York, adding the third dimension gives us a better grasp of what lies above and below us in a city. 

    fastcompany:

    Flat Maps Don’t Tell The Whole Story: View The World’s Cities In 3-D

    From London to New York, adding the third dimension gives us a better grasp of what lies above and below us in a city. 

  2. maps

    visuals

    cities

  1. Posted on 9 October, 2013

    1,096 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from explore-blog

    I’d entered the city the way one enters any grand love affair: with no exit plan. I went willing to live there forever, to become one of the women clad in slim pants and killer shoes and interesting coats. I was ready for the city to sweep me into its arms, but instead it held me at a cool distance. And so I left New York the way one leaves a love affair too: because, much as I loved it, I wasn’t truly in love.

    — Cheryl Strayed, and other celebrated women writers, on loving and leaving New York. (via explore-blog)

  2. new york

    cities

    love

    new york city

  1. Epochs last an awfully long time. We’re talking millions of years. Well, some scientists are kicking around the idea that the earth has entered a new one. Technically, we’re still in the Holocene period. But perhaps, these scientists say, humans have so influenced the direction of the planet that we should think of this as a new epoch called the anthropocene. Check out the above video for a  visualization of this idea.

    In connection with the NPR Cities Project today, NPR Blogger and astrophysicist Adam Frank suggests that the anthropocene is really the epoch of the city. Just look at the east coast from way up in an airplane, he says.   

    -Franklyn Cater

  2. nprcities

    cities

    anthropocene

    science

    urbanization

  1. Conjunto music used to be a staple in Austin, Texas. Blending polka and mariachi influences, Conjunto reflects a broad diversity of foreign cultures represented among migrant farm workers. You can hear it in this City Life Snapshot - part of the NPR Cities Project.

    Baldomero Frank Alvarez Cuellar of Rancho Alegre Radio is bringing Conjunto music back to Austin, TX.Baldomero Frank Alvarez Cuellar, of Rancho Alegre Radio, is working to bring Conjunto music back at the Moose Lodge in Austin, TX

    Thanks to Delaney Hall of Austin Music Map at KUT in Austin - a Localore project from the Association of Independents in Radio.

    Photo: Delaney Hall / KUT

  2. nprcities

    music

    mariachi

    polka

    cities

    culture

  1. 'We try to encourage folks,' she says. 'We still have to do what's right, in spite of living in a corrupt city.'

    — New Orleans Struggles With Murder Rate, And Trust

    (Source: npr)

  2. npr

    nola

    crime

    cities

  1. Here’s a new step in the effort to retrofit our cities so they run on ones and zeros.

    Lea County, New Mexico was selected this week as the site of a billion-plus dollar test location for new urban technology called the Center for Innovation Testing and Evaluation.  The plan is to build a city from scratch on more than 17 square miles of desert west of the city of Hobbs.  It’ll be big enough to house tens of thousands of people. But all those buildings will be mostly empty.

    A private company, Pegasus Global Holdings, with a background in militarizing commercial technology is behind the project. Managing Director Robert Brumley says this moves Pegasus into the multi-billion-dollar smart cities market.  Brumley tells NPR the plan is to create a place where businesses, government and universities can take ideas out of the laboratory and try them out without affecting the people or the infrastructure in a real city.

    He envisions testing self-driving trucks without the danger of running anyone over, testing energy storage without risking a power outage for residents, or testing wireless electronics without inadvertently causing people’s garage doors to open and close.

    Brumley says CITE will be a “dumb city” in construction, outfitted with “copper, dsl, cable, coax and fiber. But underneath,” he says, “we’re going to wire it up with state of the art technology.” The first step is basically to dig a gigantic hole in the ground.

    Local and state officials are welcoming and thrilled at the prospect of the new business this could generate. New Mexico’s governor turned out for the press conference.  Says Brumley: “you’ve heard of NIMBY (Not In My Backyard). We have never confronted that in New Mexico.”

    Final signatures are not on the real estate deal yet, but it involves a big land purchase and a supplemental 25 year lease from the county. The plan is to break ground for construction in June.

    -          Franklyn Cater

  2. nprcities

    urbanism

    cities

    new mexico

  1. thisbigcity:

humanscalecities:

Red Squares Indicate Land that is 100% Dedicated to Parking in Midtown Atlanta

紅框區域全是美國亞特蘭大市中心的停車場。
View in High-Res

    thisbigcity:

    humanscalecities:

    Red Squares Indicate Land that is 100% Dedicated to Parking in Midtown Atlanta

    紅框區域全是美國亞特蘭大市中心的停車場。

    (Source: yippiyeay)

  2. Atlanta

    parking

    cities

  1. thiscitycalledearth:

by Valentina C, location unknown.

    thiscitycalledearth:

    by Valentina C, location unknown.

  2. cities

  1. Posted on 10 November, 2011

    462 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from kate2fit

    climateadaptation: This is a picture of crews working for The Department of Water Protection in Los Angeles, CA pouring 3 million black plastic balls into the Ivanhoe Reservoir on June 10th, 2008. Scientists discovered that when sunlight is combined with the bromides and chlorine that are present in the water, a carcinogen bromate is formed which can be harmful to humans. The Department of Water Protection realized the problem and began construction of a new covered reservoir, but while a new underground facility was being built, they had to determine a way to keep the sunlight out of the water. They explored the possibility of tarps and metal coverings but they were either too expensive or very ugly. They settled on the idea of bird balls which are designed to keep water fowl from landing where they shouldn’t. They are non toxic, and only cost about 34 cents each. The total cost of protecting the Ivanhoe reservoir as well as the Elysian reservoir that was facing the same problem was 2 million dollars. The balls were estimated to remain in the water for five years until the new reservoir is completed.


Via: Supertight
View in High-Res

    climateadaptation: This is a picture of crews working for The Department of Water Protection in Los Angeles, CA pouring 3 million black plastic balls into the Ivanhoe Reservoir on June 10th, 2008. Scientists discovered that when sunlight is combined with the bromides and chlorine that are present in the water, a carcinogen bromate is formed which can be harmful to humans. The Department of Water Protection realized the problem and began construction of a new covered reservoir, but while a new underground facility was being built, they had to determine a way to keep the sunlight out of the water. They explored the possibility of tarps and metal coverings but they were either too expensive or very ugly. They settled on the idea of bird balls which are designed to keep water fowl from landing where they shouldn’t. They are non toxic, and only cost about 34 cents each. The total cost of protecting the Ivanhoe reservoir as well as the Elysian reservoir that was facing the same problem was 2 million dollars. The balls were estimated to remain in the water for five years until the new reservoir is completed.

    Via: Supertight

  2. water

    reservoir

    drinking water

    technology

    environmental protection

    cities

    infrastructure

  1. secretrepublic:



I thought this was interesting. What surface parking lots did to Cleaveland’s warehouse district (which is a nationally recognized historic district, oops). 
1960s vs today.

via drawingnothing

(via humanscaled)

    secretrepublic:


    I thought this was interesting. What surface parking lots did to Cleaveland’s warehouse district (which is a nationally recognized historic district, oops). 

    1960s vs today.

    via drawingnothing

    (via humanscaled)

  2. photo

    cities

    cleveland