1. NPR’s Africa Correspondent, Ofeibea Quist-Arcton is starting a Reddit IAmA chat right now! Ask her anything! 

  2. africa

    npr

    ofeibea quist-arcton

  1. Posted on 18 January, 2013

    149,974 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from escapekit

    escapekit:

    Best Friends

    Born in Africa to French wildlife photographer parents, Tippi Degré had a most unusual childhood. The young girl grew up in the African desert and developed an uncommon bond with many untamed animals including a 28-year old African elephant named Abu, a leopard nicknamed J&B, lion cubs, giraffes, an Ostrich, a mongoose, crocodiles, a baby zebra, a cheetah, giant bullfrogs, and even a snake. Africa was her home for many years and Tippi became friends with the ferocious animals and tribespeople of Namibia. As a young child, the French girl said, “I don’t have friends here. Because I never see children. So the animals are my friends.”

  2. africa

    animals

    photography

  1. Posted on 3 October, 2012

    69 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from planetmoney

    planetmoney:

Ever wondered who bought rubber ducks and cheap watches they sell on Broadway near Herald Square? Well, customers seem to come from all over the world:

Every day, small shop owners from Africa and Latin America fly into New York with wads of cash and empty suitcases. As Robert Smith reports today, their destination is zip code 10001 in Manhattan, home to a cluster of wholesale stores selling a quirky mix of decently made goods at cheap prices.

See more photos here: Photos From New York’s Junk Economy

    planetmoney:

    Ever wondered who bought rubber ducks and cheap watches they sell on Broadway near Herald Square? Well, customers seem to come from all over the world:

    Every day, small shop owners from Africa and Latin America fly into New York with wads of cash and empty suitcases. As Robert Smith reports today, their destination is zip code 10001 in Manhattan, home to a cluster of wholesale stores selling a quirky mix of decently made goods at cheap prices.

    See more photos herePhotos From New York’s Junk Economy

  2. Planet Money

    New York

    Africa

    rubber ducks

  1. Posted on 10 July, 2012

    103 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from typicalugandan

    typicalugandan:


Evening traffic scene in Kampala, Uganda.

(Photography via Apenyo)
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    typicalugandan:

    Evening traffic scene in Kampala, Uganda.

    (Photography via Apenyo)

  2. Uganda

    Africa

    motorcycles

  1. Posted on 15 May, 2012

    553 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from sabisierraleone

    View in High-Res

  2. Didier Drogba

    Africa

    Sierra Leone

    bicycles

    soccer

  1. Posted on 30 November, 2011

    227 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from

    fyeahafrica: The politics behind the “fakeness” of textiles in Togo

Real Wax, Veritable Java Print, Guaranteed Dutch Java, Genuine Amsterdam, Vlisco True Original, Vlisco China, Vlisco Wax, African Printed Textiles, etc. These are some of the labels for modern wax print textiles (also known as batik) that are available in West African markets. But which one of the above is real, authentic or legal? And are the others then fake, inauthentic or illegal?
These are the questions posed by Professor Nina Sylvanus in her studies of wax print textiles in West Africa, and particularly Togo. And it is also in Togo that consumers are voicing a desire for the law to regulate the uncontrolled dumping of “fake” wax prints from China.
Many Africans would be surprised, maybe shocked, to learn that the fabric that they have always perceived to be truly African is not. Or is it? Who can claim intellectual property for this popular textile? To get to the bottom of this is not easy, and the story must be traced back centuries, across continents and shifting global politics.
Wax print is a process that traditionally uses a manual wax resistant dyeing technique. Melted wax is applied to cloth before being dipped in dye. The dye will not penetrate the areas that are covered with wax. Sometimes several colours are used, with a series of dyeing, drying and waxing steps. After the last dyeing, the fabric is hung up to dry. Then it is dipped in a solvent to remove the wax. A negative image of the printed pattern remains on the cloth.
The invention of the copper block revolutionised batik production. By using two deep engraved copper rollers, with the mirror image of the design, the two sides of the cotton fabric are printed with a pattern of melted wax. The fact that the cloth is printed on both sides enables the product to be worn on either side, which is an indication of a quality wax print. This intricate wax printing process results in the deep rich colours and the fine crinkle lines that give batik its unique character.
Although many trace the origin of wax prints to Indonesia and India, it is an ancient art form and already existed in Egypt in the 4th century BCE, where it was used to wrap mummies. In Asia, the technique was practiced in China, India and Japan since the 7th century. It is suggested that the fabrics were “reintroduced” into Africa by land across the trans-Saharan routes. In West Africa where fabrics already played an important role in their social life, local populations like the Yoruba in Nigeria, incorporated aspects of batik into their traditional textiles.
 (continue reading/ph: Vlisco)
View in High-Res

    fyeahafrica: The politics behind the “fakeness” of textiles in Togo

    Real Wax, Veritable Java Print, Guaranteed Dutch Java, Genuine Amsterdam, Vlisco True Original, Vlisco China, Vlisco Wax, African Printed Textiles, etc. These are some of the labels for modern wax print textiles (also known as batik) that are available in West African markets. But which one of the above is real, authentic or legal? And are the others then fake, inauthentic or illegal?

    These are the questions posed by Professor Nina Sylvanus in her studies of wax print textiles in West Africa, and particularly Togo. And it is also in Togo that consumers are voicing a desire for the law to regulate the uncontrolled dumping of “fake” wax prints from China.

    Many Africans would be surprised, maybe shocked, to learn that the fabric that they have always perceived to be truly African is not. Or is it? Who can claim intellectual property for this popular textile? To get to the bottom of this is not easy, and the story must be traced back centuries, across continents and shifting global politics.

    Wax print is a process that traditionally uses a manual wax resistant dyeing technique. Melted wax is applied to cloth before being dipped in dye. The dye will not penetrate the areas that are covered with wax. Sometimes several colours are used, with a series of dyeing, drying and waxing steps. After the last dyeing, the fabric is hung up to dry. Then it is dipped in a solvent to remove the wax. A negative image of the printed pattern remains on the cloth.

    The invention of the copper block revolutionised batik production. By using two deep engraved copper rollers, with the mirror image of the design, the two sides of the cotton fabric are printed with a pattern of melted wax. The fact that the cloth is printed on both sides enables the product to be worn on either side, which is an indication of a quality wax print. This intricate wax printing process results in the deep rich colours and the fine crinkle lines that give batik its unique character.

    Although many trace the origin of wax prints to Indonesia and India, it is an ancient art form and already existed in Egypt in the 4th century BCE, where it was used to wrap mummies. In Asia, the technique was practiced in China, India and Japan since the 7th century. It is suggested that the fabrics were “reintroduced” into Africa by land across the trans-Saharan routes. In West Africa where fabrics already played an important role in their social life, local populations like the Yoruba in Nigeria, incorporated aspects of batik into their traditional textiles.

     (continue reading/ph: Vlisco)

  2. africa

    education

    history

    fashion

    clothing

  1. theafricatheynevershowyou:

    By Femi Adewunmi

    The latest Global Competitiveness Index for 2011-2012, published by the World Economic Forum, shows that Sub-Saharan African countries have their work cut out to make the region more competitive.

    Although some African countries have made progress with respect to national competitiveness, the region still lags behind the rest of the world. From a total of 142 countries, only three Sub-Saharan African countries, namely South AfricaMauritius and Rwanda, feature in the top half of the rankings. Among the bottom 20 economies, 13 are from Africa.

    The World Economic Forum defines competitiveness as “the set of institutions, policies, and factors that determine the level of productivity of a country. The level of productivity, in turn, sets the level of prosperity that can be earned by an economy. The productivity level also determines the rates of return obtained by investments in an economy, which in turn are the fundamental drivers of its growth rates. In other words, a more competitive economy is one that is likely to grow faster over time.”

    Sub-Saharan Africa’s ten most competitive countries are:

    1. South Africa
    2011-2012 overall ranking: 50
    2010-2011 overall ranking: 54

    2. Mauritius
    2011-2012 overall ranking: 54
    2010-2011 overall ranking: 55

    3. Rwanda
    2011-2012 overall ranking: 70
    2010-2011 overall ranking: 80

    4. Botswana
    2011-2012 overall ranking: 80
    2010-2011 overall ranking: 76

    5. Namibia
    2011-2012 overall ranking: 83
    2010-2011 overall ranking: 74

    6. The Gambia
    2011-2012 overall ranking: 99
    2010-2011 overall ranking: 90

    7. Kenya
    2011-2012 overall ranking: 102
    2010-2011 overall ranking: 106

    8. Benin
    2011-2012 overall ranking: 104
    2010-2011 overall ranking: 103

    9. Ethiopia
    2011-2012 overall ranking: 106
    2010-2011 overall ranking: 119

    10. Senegal
    2011-2012 overall ranking: 111
    2010-2011 overall ranking: 104


    And here’s a link to the whole WEF report.

  2. Femi Adewunmi

    World Economic Forumn

    Africa

    economics

    economy

    South Africa

    Mauritius

    Rwanda

    Botswana

    Namibia

    Gambia

    Kenya

    Benin

    Ethiopia

    Senegal

  1. Posted on 11 July, 2011

    355 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from newshour

    newshour:

More than 10 million people are desperately in need of food assistance in Ethiopia, Somalia and Kenya, the World Food Program estimated this week.
The situation in Somalia in particular is the “worst humanitarian disaster in the world,” the U.N. refugee agency said on Sunday.
Abshira Abdukadir, a four-year-old Somali girl suffering from severe diarrhea and having trouble breathing, is looked after by her parents hours after they finally reached a refugee camp in northeast Kenya and were able to get medical assistance for their ailing daughter on July 6, 2011. (ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
View in High-Res

    newshour:

    More than 10 million people are desperately in need of food assistance in Ethiopia, Somalia and Kenya, the World Food Program estimated this week.

    The situation in Somalia in particular is the “worst humanitarian disaster in the world,” the U.N. refugee agency said on Sunday.

    Abshira Abdukadir, a four-year-old Somali girl suffering from severe diarrhea and having trouble breathing, is looked after by her parents hours after they finally reached a refugee camp in northeast Kenya and were able to get medical assistance for their ailing daughter on July 6, 2011. (ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

  2. news

    africa

    horn of africa

    drought

    health

    global health

    somalia

    kenya

    ethiopia

    world food program

    refugee

    photos