1. Isn’t this just the old Adam West-era Batmobile? POW! BANG!
picturesoftheday:

The September, 1955 issue of Reading Automobile Club Magazine – a magazine from the town of Reading, Pennsylvania associated with AAA – included an article by Michael Frome titled, “A Travel Editor Speculates: If Today Were 1965!”
The piece mentions some staples of futurism from the time, such as  the four-day work week, which would allow citizens to take full  advantage of the benefits resulting from greater mobility.
Frome also quotes Robert F. Kohr, director of Ford’s engineering staff about the future of the automobile:

“Today’s developments, no matter how advanced,” [Kohr]  said then, “will be antiquated by 1965 — though that is just a little  too far in the future for any accurate prediction.
“The passenger car engine probably will be lighter, smaller and more  compact. It should have greater combustion efficiency, higher  compression ratios and improved ignition. If some of today’s knotty  metallurgical problems are solved, a gas turbine power plant, weighing  roughly half as much as the reciprocating engine, may be used.
“Tomorrow’s automobile will be a highly dependable and durable  vehicle, requiring fewer repairs and less frequent servicing. Strong,  light metals, such as magnesium and titanium, may perform increasingly  important roles in engine and body construction.
“Visibility will be enhanced, probably by smaller structural supports  and greater use of glass — although car glass may be tough enough to  support the roof itself, and impregnated to filter out the burning rays  of the sun. Stylists will attempt to lower the future automobile,  imparting a longer, wider and faster look. Sliding car doors are a  possibility. Electronic controls will be popular.”

(via Smithsonian)
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    Isn’t this just the old Adam West-era Batmobile? POW! BANG!

    picturesoftheday:

    The September, 1955 issue of Reading Automobile Club Magazine – a magazine from the town of Reading, Pennsylvania associated with AAA – included an article by Michael Frome titled, “A Travel Editor Speculates: If Today Were 1965!”

    The piece mentions some staples of futurism from the time, such as the four-day work week, which would allow citizens to take full advantage of the benefits resulting from greater mobility.

    Frome also quotes Robert F. Kohr, director of Ford’s engineering staff about the future of the automobile:

    “Today’s developments, no matter how advanced,” [Kohr] said then, “will be antiquated by 1965 — though that is just a little too far in the future for any accurate prediction.

    “The passenger car engine probably will be lighter, smaller and more compact. It should have greater combustion efficiency, higher compression ratios and improved ignition. If some of today’s knotty metallurgical problems are solved, a gas turbine power plant, weighing roughly half as much as the reciprocating engine, may be used.

    “Tomorrow’s automobile will be a highly dependable and durable vehicle, requiring fewer repairs and less frequent servicing. Strong, light metals, such as magnesium and titanium, may perform increasingly important roles in engine and body construction.

    “Visibility will be enhanced, probably by smaller structural supports and greater use of glass — although car glass may be tough enough to support the roof itself, and impregnated to filter out the burning rays of the sun. Stylists will attempt to lower the future automobile, imparting a longer, wider and faster look. Sliding car doors are a possibility. Electronic controls will be popular.”

    (via Smithsonian)

  2. history

    transport