1. Angela Stimpson donated a kidney to a complete stranger. Why did she do it? Researchers found that the brains of Stimpson and other altruists are sensitive to fear and distress in a stranger’s face.
Good Deeds May Be Rooted In The Brain
Illustration credit: Rob Donnelly for NPR View in High-Res

    Angela Stimpson donated a kidney to a complete stranger. Why did she do it? Researchers found that the brains of Stimpson and other altruists are sensitive to fear and distress in a stranger’s face.

    Good Deeds May Be Rooted In The Brain

    Illustration credit: Rob Donnelly for NPR

  2. Michelle Trudeau

    Altruism

    Angela Stimpson

  1. nprfreshair:

Today actor Ron Perlman (Sons of Anarchy, Hellboy) joins us to talk about his new memoir, Easy Street (The Hard Way).  In the interview he tells us about what it’s like acting under heavy prosthetic makeup:

"You look like you’re doing a lot of stuff because you’re covered, but the makeup is so seamless and so liquid. The more subtle you are, the more expressive you are. Everything you’re doing, even if you’re just thinking something without moving a muscle, it shows through. When I realized how little I had to do in prosthetic makeup and that the makeup was nothing more than an enhancement — an addition, another layer that added to the texture of the character — it was a liberating feeling for me."



View in High-Res

    nprfreshair:

    Today actor Ron Perlman (Sons of Anarchy, Hellboy) joins us to talk about his new memoir, Easy Street (The Hard Way).  In the interview he tells us about what it’s like acting under heavy prosthetic makeup:

    "You look like you’re doing a lot of stuff because you’re covered, but the makeup is so seamless and so liquid. The more subtle you are, the more expressive you are. Everything you’re doing, even if you’re just thinking something without moving a muscle, it shows through. When I realized how little I had to do in prosthetic makeup and that the makeup was nothing more than an enhancement — an addition, another layer that added to the texture of the character — it was a liberating feeling for me."

  2. Ron Perlman

    Fresh Air

    makeup

    acting

    hellboy

  1. smithsonianlibraries:

About a year ago, we posted a gif of hover whales. This, however, was our original creation—at the time too big for Tumblr but now able to be posted.
from Suggestions to the keepers of the U.S. life-saving stations, light-houses, and light-ships; and to other observers, relative to the best means of collecting and preserving specimens of whales and porpoises. By Frederick W. True.

    smithsonianlibraries:

    About a year ago, we posted a gif of hover whales. This, however, was our original creation—at the time too big for Tumblr but now able to be posted.

    from Suggestions to the keepers of the U.S. life-saving stations, light-houses, and light-ships; and to other observers, relative to the best means of collecting and preserving specimens of whales and porpoises. By Frederick W. True.

  2. hover whales

    awesome

  1. The Only One: A Talk With Shonda Rhimes



Who often gets asked about television as a whole? About people of color on television? About black women on television? Who’s expected to act as broadcast television’s conscience and diversity czar? Shonda Rhimes. And every minute she’s asked to spend serving that function, valuable and necessary as it is, and perfectly understandable as it is that people are curious about her experiences, is a minute she’s not answering the same questions Damon Lindelof gets, or Joss Whedon gets, or Chuck Lorre gets. She’s not talking about her process, she’s not talking about her characters, she’s not telling her silly show business stories. She’s saying yes, this is bad (as we know). Yes, this is a loss (as we know). Yes, networks who ignore entire audiences are leaving viewers on the table at a time when nobody can afford to do that (as we know).
This is why I’m telling you all this. This is why I’m in this story: because this is where the struggle I was having dovetails with what’s going on in Alessandra Stanley’s piece.
The question of how to interview her in a way that doesn’t ignore interesting characteristics of her work and doesn’t pretend we’re in a post-racial landscape where none of this exists but also doesn’t treat her as solely Shonda Rhimes The Black Female Showrunner is related to the question of how to receive female characters of color and acknowledge that their race is part of their identity without thinking of them as primarily in terms of what kind of Black Female Character they are or how they fit into the picture of diversity.

Photo Credit: Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images View in High-Res

    The Only One: A Talk With Shonda Rhimes

    Who often gets asked about television as a whole? About people of color on television? About black women on television? Who’s expected to act as broadcast television’s conscience and diversity czar? Shonda Rhimes. And every minute she’s asked to spend serving that function, valuable and necessary as it is, and perfectly understandable as it is that people are curious about her experiences, is a minute she’s not answering the same questions Damon Lindelof gets, or Joss Whedon gets, or Chuck Lorre gets. She’s not talking about her process, she’s not talking about her characters, she’s not telling her silly show business stories. She’s saying yes, this is bad (as we know). Yes, this is a loss (as we know). Yes, networks who ignore entire audiences are leaving viewers on the table at a time when nobody can afford to do that (as we know).

    This is why I’m telling you all this. This is why I’m in this story: because this is where the struggle I was having dovetails with what’s going on in Alessandra Stanley’s piece.

    The question of how to interview her in a way that doesn’t ignore interesting characteristics of her work and doesn’t pretend we’re in a post-racial landscape where none of this exists but also doesn’t treat her as solely Shonda Rhimes The Black Female Showrunner is related to the question of how to receive female characters of color and acknowledge that their race is part of their identity without thinking of them as primarily in terms of what kind of Black Female Character they are or how they fit into the picture of diversity.

    Photo Credit: Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

  2. shonda rhimes

    Linda Holmes

    Alessandra Stanley

    Viola Davis

  1. Posted on 22 September, 2014

    295 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from nprmusic

    nprmusic:

No singer can touch Lucinda Williams when she’s calling from the lonely outskirts of Despairville.
Stream Down Where The Spirit Meets The Bone from NPR Music’s First Listen. 
View in High-Res

    nprmusic:

    No singer can touch Lucinda Williams when she’s calling from the lonely outskirts of Despairville.

    Stream Down Where The Spirit Meets The Bone from NPR Music’s First Listen

  2. Lucinda Williams

    NPR Music

    First Listen

  1. historicaltimes:

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist, at the women’s right to vote march on Fifth Avenue in New York City. October 23, 1917
View in High-Res

    historicaltimes:

    Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist, at the women’s right to vote march on Fifth Avenue in New York City. October 23, 1917

  2. Komako Kimura

    sufferage

    1910s

  1. Chronic stress can lead to heart disease, cancer and other health problems. A study shows it doesn’t matter if the stress comes from major life events or minor hassles. 
Best To Not Sweat The Small Stuff, Because It Could Kill You
Illustration credit: Keith Negley for NPR
(A Monday morning reminder to take a deep breath)
-Kate View in High-Res

    Chronic stress can lead to heart disease, cancer and other health problems. A study shows it doesn’t matter if the stress comes from major life events or minor hassles. 

    Best To Not Sweat The Small Stuff, Because It Could Kill You

    Illustration credit: Keith Negley for NPR

    (A Monday morning reminder to take a deep breath)

    -Kate

  2. patti neighmond

    stress

    Don't sweat the small stuff

    health news

  1. nprglobalhealth:

Some Airports Have A New Security Routine: Taking Your Temperature
Airports in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone are relying on a familiar tool to stop the spread of Ebola: the thermometer.
Airport staff are measuring the temperature of anyone trying to leave the country, looking for “unexplained febrile illness,” according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which is advising these countries on their exit screening processes.
Other countries that are far from the infected region are screening passengers arriving from West Africa or who have a history of travel to the region. Temperature takers include Russia, Australia and India.
Travelers who exhibit an elevated fever, generally over 101.4 degrees Fahrenheit (though it varies by country), are stopped for further screening. That could mean a questionnaire or medical tests.
Critics of exit screening have pointed out the flaws in using thermometers: fever can lay dormant for two to 21 days in someone who’s been infected with Ebola, and low-grade fevers can be lowered further by simple medications like Tylenol or Advil.
While they can’t predict symptoms before they emerge, the CDC is prepared to thwart those trying to mask a fever with a pill.
"Airline and airport staff are trained to do visual checks of anyone who looks even slightly ill," says Tai Chen, a quarantine medical officer from the CDC who returned from Liberia this past Tuesday. "And most airports are using multiple temperature checks, starting when you arrive on the airport grounds in your car until you get on the plane. Even if you take medication, your fever will likely have manifested by then."
Here’s the three methods that can be used at airports.
Photo: A Nepalese health worker uses a handheld infrared thermometer on a passenger arriving at Nepal’s only international airport in Kathmandu. (Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images)
View in High-Res

    nprglobalhealth:

    Some Airports Have A New Security Routine: Taking Your Temperature

    Airports in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone are relying on a familiar tool to stop the spread of Ebola: the thermometer.

    Airport staff are measuring the temperature of anyone trying to leave the country, looking for “unexplained febrile illness,” according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which is advising these countries on their exit screening processes.

    Other countries that are far from the infected region are screening passengers arriving from West Africa or who have a history of travel to the region. Temperature takers include Russia, Australia and India.

    Travelers who exhibit an elevated fever, generally over 101.4 degrees Fahrenheit (though it varies by country), are stopped for further screening. That could mean a questionnaire or medical tests.

    Critics of exit screening have pointed out the flaws in using thermometers: fever can lay dormant for two to 21 days in someone who’s been infected with Ebola, and low-grade fevers can be lowered further by simple medications like Tylenol or Advil.

    While they can’t predict symptoms before they emerge, the CDC is prepared to thwart those trying to mask a fever with a pill.

    "Airline and airport staff are trained to do visual checks of anyone who looks even slightly ill," says Tai Chen, a quarantine medical officer from the CDC who returned from Liberia this past Tuesday. "And most airports are using multiple temperature checks, starting when you arrive on the airport grounds in your car until you get on the plane. Even if you take medication, your fever will likely have manifested by then."

    Here’s the three methods that can be used at airports.

    Photo: A Nepalese health worker uses a handheld infrared thermometer on a passenger arriving at Nepal’s only international airport in Kathmandu. (Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images)

  2. NPR global health

    ebola

    airport security

  1. lookatthisstory:

    Two wars, two veterans, both homeless. Henry Addington, 67, served with the Navy in Vietnam and Dan Martin, 29, was a medic in Afghanistan.

    If you ask them, homeless veterans might tell you they only have a vague idea of what they look like, or how they got to where they are. At least that was true of the few we met in San Diego.

    There are about 50,000 homeless vets in the U.S., according to the Department of Veterans Affairs. Veterans who have struggled with drug use or mental illness, unemployment or criminal records — or any number of things.

    NPR spoke with Henry, Dan and 7 other veterans in a pop-up portrait studio at Stand Down San Diego. Find out what they had to say.

  2. Look at this

    veterans

    homelessness

  1. Posted on 19 September, 2014

    951 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from wnyc

    wnyc:

The best and most important blog we discovered this week places octopuses on the heads of United States vice-presidents. All of them.
http://bit.ly/XvhGG6

This is for all of the marine biologists/history buffs out there. -Emily View in High-Res

    wnyc:

    The best and most important blog we discovered this week places octopuses on the heads of United States vice-presidents. All of them.

    http://bit.ly/XvhGG6

    This is for all of the marine biologists/history buffs out there. -Emily

  2. wnyc

    octopus

    vps

    jonathan crow