1. Photos: Meg Vogel/NPR

    "Hunting For The Tastiest Egg: Duck, Goose, Chicken Or Quail?"

  2. The Salt

    Eggs

    Duck

    Goose

    Chicken

    Quail

  1. Posted on 18 April, 2014

    57 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from npr8

    npr8:

    image

    (photo cred: Aimee Gottlieb)

    Only four more days to go and all that’s left to do is trust. Trust that I’ve put enough miles in, trust that I’ve prepped my equipment to be the best it can be and trust myself to know I can do this. I’ve worked hard the past year, training and running like a…

  2. NPR8

  1. htdeverything:

    How to avoid a bad bee sting, get back at bad Facebook posters, and look cool when you’re carrying a Trapper Keeper. 

  1. Posted on 18 April, 2014

    784 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from nprfreshair

    nprfreshair:

One of Amy Schumer’s comedy routines begins with the declaration, “I’m a little sluttier than the average bear. I really am.”
Degrees of sluttiness may be hard to define, but Schumer does talk frankly about many subjects — including sex — that can be uncomfortable for people, both in her stand-up act and on her Comedy Central series, Inside Amy Schumer, now in its second season. 
When Amy spoke with Terry Gross last year, she revealed why she’s so at ease talking about sex:  

"I have a joke where I say, ‘Oh, I’m going to bring [my mom] to a soccer game because I want to show her what boundaries look like.’ I just grew up in a house where things weren’t that taboo to talk about. And my mom, when she was teaching us to say our different body parts, taught me how to say ‘vagina’ the same that she taught me how to say ‘ear.’I think she wanted us to be able to tell her if we were ever molested without being embarrassed — and so there wasn’t this sense of shame. And I was running around naked to an age that probably wasn’t appropriate and just never was made to feel embarrassed or shamed because of my body or think anything was wrong with me, probably to a fault." 

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    nprfreshair:

    One of Amy Schumers comedy routines begins with the declaration, “I’m a little sluttier than the average bear. I really am.”

    Degrees of sluttiness may be hard to define, but Schumer does talk frankly about many subjects — including sex — that can be uncomfortable for people, both in her stand-up act and on her Comedy Central series, Inside Amy Schumer, now in its second season. 

    When Amy spoke with Terry Gross last year, she revealed why she’s so at ease talking about sex:  

    "I have a joke where I say, ‘Oh, I’m going to bring [my mom] to a soccer game because I want to show her what boundaries look like.’ I just grew up in a house where things weren’t that taboo to talk about. And my mom, when she was teaching us to say our different body parts, taught me how to say ‘vagina’ the same that she taught me how to say ‘ear.’I think she wanted us to be able to tell her if we were ever molested without being embarrassed — and so there wasn’t this sense of shame. And I was running around naked to an age that probably wasn’t appropriate and just never was made to feel embarrassed or shamed because of my body or think anything was wrong with me, probably to a fault." 

  1. Posted on 18 April, 2014

    814 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from soundbitecity

    thisbigcity:

    soundbitecity:

    No Surface Without a Seat

    Berlin isn’t the warmest of places, so I was continually surprised by the amount of outdoor seating around the city.  In some neighborhoods, sidewalk cafes, public benches, beer gardens, or terraces seemed to be at every turn.  But what surprised me even more than the sheer amount of seating, was the seemingly ad-hoc, improvised, or innovative nature of many of the options.  Anywhere there was a surface or some extra space, you were bound to find a cushion, a folding chair, a crate, or some recycled materials inviting you to sit down and take a break.  It wasn’t limited to restaurants and bars either - cushions and chairs could be found on the steps, ledges, sidewalks, and street corners outside of clothing stores, gift shops, and all sorts of other random places.

    My visit was in April, presumably the time of year when these chairs and cushions first emerge from winter storage.  I’d be curious to take walk through the city in summertime to see them in greater use, and to see if even more sprout up.  It must create an impressively vibrant street life.

    Photos taken April, 2014

    Take a seat!

  1. Posted on 18 April, 2014

    51 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from npr8

    npr8:

    No, not a running group (because I prefer to run alone), but the group I cool down with post-run.

    Please meet [left to right] Phoebe and Chandler.

    image

    They certainly cannot participant in my runs, but they always accompany me on my post-run walk / rest seshes. They are much better at the…

  1. Posted on 18 April, 2014

    99 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from wrightbryan3

    wrightbryan3:

Approaching NPR (at NPR)
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    wrightbryan3:

    Approaching NPR (at NPR)

  1. Catch up on this morning’s news via our homepage. View in High-Res

    Catch up on this morning’s news via our homepage.

  2. NPR

    News

    Digital

  1. cartermagazine:

Today In History
‘Alice Walker, poet and activist, received the “Pulitzer Prize” in fiction for The Color Purple on this date April 17, 1983.’
(photo: Alice Walker)
- CARTER Magazine

    cartermagazine:

    Today In History

    ‘Alice Walker, poet and activist, received the “Pulitzer Prize” in fiction for The Color Purple on this date April 17, 1983.’

    (photo: Alice Walker)

    - CARTER Magazine

  1. Posted on 17 April, 2014

    1,853 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from nprbooks

    nprbooks:

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.
His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.
Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.
"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."
Read our full appreciation here.
Image via See Colombia
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    nprbooks:

    Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.

    His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.

    Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.

    "Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."

    Read our full appreciation here.

    Image via See Colombia