1. Posted on 17 October, 2014

    1,751 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from nprfreshair

    It’s not like astronauts are braver than other people; we’re just meticulously prepared. We dissect what it is that’s going to scare us, and what it is that is a threat to us and then we practice over and over again so that the natural irrational fear is neutralized.

    — 

    Astronaut Chris Hadfield

    Astronaut Chris Hadfield Brings Lessons From Space Down To Earth

    (via nprfreshair)

  1. Three-Year-Old Ebola Survivor Proposes to Nurse
And she says yes! Ibrahim is one of three brothers who lost their mother to Ebola — but survived. While waiting to be reunited with his dad, the little boy fell in love.
Photo: Anders Kelto for NPR View in High-Res

    Three-Year-Old Ebola Survivor Proposes to Nurse

    And she says yes! Ibrahim is one of three brothers who lost their mother to Ebola — but survived. While waiting to be reunited with his dad, the little boy fell in love.

    Photo: Anders Kelto for NPR

  2. ebola

    sierra leone

  1. Not every dancer can be a ballerina, and not every ballerina gets to dance with the New York City Ballet. So when one makes it, and then stays with the company for three decades, it’s a big deal.

    Wendy Whelan is that ballerina. And on Saturday night, at 47 years old, she’ll give her final New York City Ballet performance before she retires.

    "I’m sure I’ll get very emotional after," Whelan says. "I don’t expect to get emotional during. It’s not my style, I just don’t do that. But I’ll probably enter a depression, and I just know that I will do that because I always do that after a big ballet experience. … But this is the end of a ballet career, so that’s a bit bigger than just a season of ballet."

    Hear the story and see more photos from the preparation for Whelan’s last performance over here.

    Photos by Erin Baiano for NPR

  2. ballet

    Photography

    erin baiano

    wendy whelan

    new york city ballet

    dance

  1. Posted on 17 October, 2014

    2,293 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from nprfreshair

    nprfreshair:

Justin Simien, director of Dear White People, joins Fresh Air to discuss his new film and what motivated him to make a satire about race relations and racial identity.  
Simien on how “white movies” are just “movies”

"[Recently] Hollywood has gotten more myopic and has to make very specific choices based on how they think the audience will respond when putting a movie through the production pipeline. It’s gotten real crazily bad, I think.


I think TV has gotten it right. Shonda Rhimes has figured it out, getting multiracial casts on television and appealing to everybody. It’s interesting because I haven’t seen that with “white movies,” which most people just call “movies.” They don’t just appeal to white people, it’s taken as given that a white cast represents everyone: A white male in a movie is an everyman type character, whereas a black man in a movie is a black character and it’s a black movie and it’s only for black people.”

'Dear White People': A Satire About Racial Identity Addressed To Everyone
View in High-Res

    nprfreshair:

    Justin Simien, director of Dear White People, joins Fresh Air to discuss his new film and what motivated him to make a satire about race relations and racial identity.  

    Simien on how “white movies” are just “movies”

    "[Recently] Hollywood has gotten more myopic and has to make very specific choices based on how they think the audience will respond when putting a movie through the production pipeline. It’s gotten real crazily bad, I think.

    I think TV has gotten it right. Shonda Rhimes has figured it out, getting multiracial casts on television and appealing to everybody. It’s interesting because I haven’t seen that with “white movies,” which most people just call “movies.” They don’t just appeal to white people, it’s taken as given that a white cast represents everyone: A white male in a movie is an everyman type character, whereas a black man in a movie is a black character and it’s a black movie and it’s only for black people.”

    'Dear White People': A Satire About Racial Identity Addressed To Everyone

  2. justin simien

    dear white people

    satire

    race

    fresh air

  1. You may not know the name Homer Laughlin, a china factory in Newell, W. Va., but you’ll likely recognize — or have eaten off of — its most famous product: brightly colored, informal pottery called Fiesta.

    While most of America’s china factories have closed, unable to compete with “made in China” or Japan or Mexico, Homer Laughlin, which set up shop on the banks of the Ohio River in 1873, is still going strong. It employs about 1,000 people.

    Linda Wertheimer takes us into the depths of the factory — which feels like a relic from a different time — to show us how Fiesta has kept this company going.

    Photos/GIFs by Ross Mantle for NPR

  2. NPRfiesta

    fiesta

    manufacturing

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  1. When Malala Yousafzai found out last Friday that she’d won the Nobel Peace Prize, along with Indian activist Kailash Satyarthi, the 17-year-old Pakistani girl didn’t celebrate immediately. Instead she returned to a chemistry class at her high school in Birmingham, England.
The Nobel Prize, she joked on Friday, is “not going to help in exams.” Then she said: “I want to see every child going to school. There are still 57 million children who have not received education.”

What needs to be done to reach those unschooled children? Goats and Soda spoke with Jacqueline Bhabha, a professor at the Harvard School of Public Health and director of research at the university’s FXB Center for Health and Human Rights who specializes in children’s rights.
What Will Malala’s Nobel Peace Prize Mean For Girls’ Education?
Photo credit: Noorullah Shirzada/AFP/Getty Images View in High-Res

    When Malala Yousafzai found out last Friday that she’d won the Nobel Peace Prize, along with Indian activist Kailash Satyarthi, the 17-year-old Pakistani girl didn’t celebrate immediately. Instead she returned to a chemistry class at her high school in Birmingham, England.

    The Nobel Prize, she joked on Friday, is “not going to help in exams.” Then she said: “I want to see every child going to school. There are still 57 million children who have not received education.”

    What needs to be done to reach those unschooled children? Goats and Soda spoke with Jacqueline Bhabha, a professor at the Harvard School of Public Health and director of research at the university’s FXB Center for Health and Human Rights who specializes in children’s rights.

    What Will Malala’s Nobel Peace Prize Mean For Girls’ Education?

    Photo credit: Noorullah Shirzada/AFP/Getty Images

  2. malala

    malala yousafzai

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    Millennium Development Goals

  1. Posted on 15 October, 2014

    97 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from nprmusic

    nprmusic:

    LIVE TONIGHT: Watch Wynton Marsalis present a new work inspired by the Santería religion, featuring pianist Chucho Valdés. That starts at 9 p.m. ET.

    Go to npr.org/jazznight at 9 p.m. EST tonight

  2. Santería

    Chucho Valdés

    Wynton Marsalis

  1. Posted on 15 October, 2014

    208 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from nprpolitics

    nprpolitics:

    Recognize that face in those selfies? It’s none other than American Idol alum CLAY AIKEN. He’s running for Congress in North Carolina. And yes, that’s a custom cheer. 

    Tamara Keith has his story tomorrow on Morning Edition

    Clay Aiken: An American Idol On The Campaign Trail In North Carolina

  2. Clay Aiken

    2014 elections

    North Carolina

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    Tamara Keith

  1. I do believe that books can change lives and give people this kind of language they wouldn’t have had otherwise

    — Jacqueline Woodson, author of Brown Girl Dreaming. She’s one of the finalists for the 2014 National Book Award in the Young People’s Literature category. The finalists were announced today on Morning Edition. NPR’s Kat Chow interviewed Woodson earlier this year about her stories and the need for more diversity in books.

  2. jacqueline woodson

    brown girl dreaming

    Young People's Literature

    National Book Award

    books

  1. Posted on 15 October, 2014

    1,839 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from skunkbear

    skunkbear:

    All those little lines are jokes! ALL THE JOKES! (at least the ones I noticed)

    Last year Jeremy Bowers, Danny DeBelius, Christopher Groskopf, Aly Hurt and I made a very silly interactive graphic exhaustively tabulating the running jokes in Arrested Development, along with their connections:

    http://apps.npr.org/arrested-development/

    And wouldn’t you know it, someone just put in a book — giving me an excuse to put in on tumblr. So if you’d like to see how many times GOB says “I’ve made a huge mistake,” check out the graphic.

    I’ve made a huge mistake. And my mistake is not seeing this infographic until now. -Kate

  2. infographics

    arrested development

    data visualization